ISTITUTO MARANGONI MIAMI

WELCOME TO ISTITUTO MARANGONI MIAMI

Istituto Marangoni Miami Inc. is licensed by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education, 325 West Gaines Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee Florida 32399, License # 5827. Additional information regarding the institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission at 1-888-224-6684 toll-free Fax 850-245-323

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

The essence of fashion and design: this is what is taught at Istituto Marangoni’s international network of schools and training centers worldwide. Professionals who are passionate about their work and willing to share their expertise teach young talent fashion, design and creative.

Where theory is taught alongside practice, students learn that creativity is a gift to be continuously nurtured, nourished and stimulated, with both passion and dedication. It is the same passion for the world of fashion and design with which our teachers teach. Istituto Marangoni Miami programs are designed to respond to the needs of the industry today, and are constantly monitored to ensure these needs are met.

MISSION & GOALS

To excel as a center of professional and creative learning in the Fashion, Art and Design fields; to nourish international industries, providing talented Istituto Marangoni Miami graduates from all over the world.

We strive to achieve this mission by:

  • offering an extensive and detailed educational  portfolio
  • achieving the academic standards with modern and dynamic curricula focused on results;
  • integrating the spirit of ‘Italianess’ into the experience of students on a daily basis through both curricula and the school experience;
  • celebrating the global and multicultural reach of Italian culture through Fashion, Art and Design;
  • supporting and developing the potential of our teaching and administrative staff, by means of constant and punctual training;
  • placing Istituto Marangoni Miami at the center of the Fashion, Art and Design cultures, with the support and collaboration from Istituto Marangoni’s established network of international school locations in leading world cultural capitals; Milano, Firenze, Paris, London, Shanghai* and Shenzhen*
  • further strengthening historical and recent connections with the most  important  companies  and personalities in the luxury Fashion, Art and Design market.

Since 1935, this has been the mission of Istituto Marangoni, beginning with fashion and extending to design and  fashion  business,  always  with  the  aim  of  providing  those  who  choose  Istituto  Marangoni  institutes, schools and centers for their training to express themselves creatively. Today, all Istituto Marangoni schools are part of an established and recognized aesthetic laboratory of European-­‐style culture with a specifically Italian imprint.

* Training centre

VISION

Following in the footsteps of Istituto Marangoni’s international network of schools and training centers worldwide  in  enhancing  talents  since  1935,  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami’s  vision  is  to  always  be  at  the centre of style, to drive student’s ambitions and dreams through creativity and innovation, to support creative  industries  worldwide,  and  to  provide  a  solid  and  cross-­‐disciplinary  approach  to  education, research and business solutions in the world of Fashion, Design and Art.

OWNERSHIP / LEGAL CONTROL

Istituto Marangoni Miami is Owned by Istituto Marangoni Miami, Inc

Istituto Marangoni Miami Inc. is a for profit corporation in the state of Florida operated by the President of the Company, Hakan Baykam.

A Board of Directors controls the Istituto Marangoni Miami Inc. It is composed by a President & CEO, and Chief Financial Officer.  The academic structure of full time teachers has been entirely recruited within the

Istituto Marangoni’s companies in the world headquarters will refer to a School Director. The  School Director is a direct report of the Board of Directors.

ACADEMIC CALENDAR AND HOLIDAYS 

Academic year 2018 (SPRING 2018)
First day of Classes (1st semester start) January 8, 2018
Drop / Add Period Jan 8 – Jan 16, 2018
Martin Luther King Jr. Day January 15, 2018
Drop / Add Period Jan 8 – Jan 16, 2018
President’s Day February 20, 2018
Spring vacation begins March 12, 2018
Spring vacation ends March 18, 2018
Easter /Passover Holiday March 30, 2018
Last day of Classes (1st   semester end) April 27, 2018 (exams May 14 -­‐      25)
Exam session (Spring 2018) May 1 -­‐  11, 2018

 

Academic year 2018 (SUMMER 2018)
First day of Classes (2nd semester start) May 14, 2018
Last Day to Add/Drop Courses May 14 -­‐ 21, 2018
Memorial Day Holiday May 28, 2018
Independence Day Holiday July 4, 2018
Last day of Classes (2nd semester end) August 3, 2018
Exam session (Summer 2018) August 6 – 10, 2018

 

Academic year 2018 (FALL 2018)
First day of Classes (3rd semester start) August 27, 2018
Drop / Add Period August 27 – September 4, 2018
Labor Day September 3, 2018
Drop / Add Period Jan 8 – Jan 16, 2018
Last day of Classes (3rd semester end) December 7, 2018
Exam session (Fall 2018) December 10-­‐21, 2018
Winter Break December 24 – January 2, 2018
*Please note that the academic calendar dates are subject to change. All dates will be confirmed at the beginning of the semester.  

 

School Hours Monday to Friday 8:00AM – 9:00PM
Saturday 9:00AM – 3:00PM
Office Hours Monday to Friday 9:00AM – 5:00PM
Library Monday to Friday 9:00AM – 7:00PM
Saturday 9:00AM – 1:00PM

 

GENERAL INFORMATION HOURS OF OPERATION

School Hours Monday to Friday 8:00AM – 9:00PM
Saturday 9:00AM – 3:00PM
Office Hours Monday to Friday 9:00AM – 5:00PM
Library Monday to Friday 9:00AM – 7:00PM
Saturday 9:00AM – 1:00PM

 

LICENSING

Istituto Marangoni Miami Inc. is a private institution organized as a for profit corporation under the Laws of the  State  of  Florida  and  Licensed  by  the  Commission  for  Independent Education,  Florida  Department  of Education. Additional information regarding this institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission at  325  West  Gaines  Street,  Suite  1414, Tallahassee,  FL  32399-­‐0400,  toll-­‐free  telephone  number  (888)224-­‐ 6684.

ACCREDITATION

Istituto Marangoni Miami School is currently not accredited.

SEMESTER CREDIT SYSTEM

The semester credit system at Istituto Marangoni Miami will run from:
Spring:                    January to May
Summer:                 July to August
Fall:                         August to December

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL

The organizational structure of Istituto Marangoni Miami is simple and flexible, allowing the school to expand to fit the diversification of the school programs and new demands based on growth. The school administrators consists of the following:

Hakan Baykam – President Istituto Marangoni Miami Inc Giorgio Invernizzi – Chief Financial Officer

As the School develops through increased enrollment there will be an increase in leadership and operational position. These positions will cover: directors, faculty, orientation, admissions, student support, and careers development.

The management of Istituto Marangoni Miami activity is divided into two main branches: “Academics” and “Administration”.

The Academic Team is responsible for the quality of the programs; it is in charge of designing, developing and delivering programs; it also manages the students’ academic support, the monitoring of the programs and their continuous improvement year on year and for providing students’ pastoral support from their enrolment to graduation and their first contact with the professional world.

Faculty  and Program Leaders are members of the Academics Team .

The Administrative Team is responsible for the organizational part of programs

GOVERNANCE OF THE SCHOOL

The Officers of the School manage the operations of the School. The Officers have the authority to conduct the following functions:

  • Establish policies and procedures for the school;
  • Select the School Director of the school;
  • Amend and approval the annual budget of the school;
  • Determine the compensation of the School Directors, and other staff members;
  • Perform any tasks in the administration of the

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

President & CEO Hakan Baykam

The primary responsibilities are to oversee all School functions and all ultimate decision-­‐making); give final approval on all faculty hiring and other major decisions (except those decisions requiring Board approval); network with pertinent industry personnel; promote the School within the community;

modify the purpose and missions of the School as it grows and develops and as the needs of students and the market change over time; and perform other duties as designated by the Board of Directors.

Chief Executive Officer CEO

The  responsibilities  of  the  Executive  Officer  include  the  supervision  of  academic  affairs,  faculty  and student  services.  The  Officer  administers  the  day-­‐to-­‐day  operations  of  the  School  consistent  with  the standards and procedures adopted by the School.

Chief Financial Officer CFO Giorgio Invernizzi

The responsibilities of the Chief Financial Officer are the administration of financial affairs and involvement in public service, networking with pertinent industry personnel, as well as the physical facilities of the School, and the general administration of the School consistent with its adopted standards and procedures. The Chief Financial Officer develops and administers the School budget, and supervises the maintenance of employee records for payroll and benefits and directs the implementation of payroll for all personnel. The CFO performs other duties as designated by the President.

School Director   Pablo Arbelaez

The School Director is the highest level at the School and manages and supervises school operations and the activities of the staff, both Academic and Administrative.

Academic Director/Director of Education Massimo Casagrande

The Director of Education (DE) is responsible for course selection, quality and content.  Futhermore they oversee admissions and assist in developing registration schedules and procedures, analyze academic records, statistics and archives, and direct the preparation of student transcripts. The DE is assisted by the School Director in monitoring the awarding of titles and degrees and in monitoring retention of students. The Director of Education reports directly to the School Director.

Information, Orientation & Admissions Giulia Camporese

The Information Office provides information on all the courses and programs of Istituto Marangoni Miami, and provides support for every phase of a students’ enrolment. An Orientation service offers the possibility to individually discuss which would be the correct program for candidates’ talents and interests. During an interview, candidates can present their work or portfolio, especially if they have already attended other schools in the Fashion field. The Orientation service is also available to support students in finding accommodation.

Librarian/Reception

Desiree  Roland  is  the  librarian  for  the  school.  The  school  has  also  contracted  with  (Library  and Information  resources)  LIRN  to  provide  the  students  an  extensive  souces  of  information.  The  Library Service  aims  to  make  the  learning  resources  well  managed,  relevant,  up-­‐to-­‐date  and  easily  accessible for students and also to support students in the correct use of these resources and in research practices themselves.

Careers Service

For participants who are nearing graduation Istituto Marangoni offers a careers service for professional orientation; from the preparation of a Resume / CV and interview techniques, through to contact with companies offering internships and other professional opportunities.

Job placement is not guaranteed.

FACILITIES & SPACES

Istituto Marangoni Miami is located at 3704 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami FL 33137.

The space consists of 21,957 square feet. The School facility is equipped to accommodate the needs of the  School’s   students,   faculty   and   staff.   Classrooms   contain   adequate   seating   and   traditional educational  equipment  applicable  to  the  specific  educational  area.  In  addition,  several  classrooms contain technological and audio-­‐visual devices to provide students with an educational experience. The

School   facility   also   includes   labs   and   small   classrooms,   where   faculty   may   hold   smaller  learning sessions. Students have access to the School library’s computer lab, which holds computers   and high-­‐ speed Internet connections.

In particular, classrooms are divided into:

  • theory classrooms: for frontal lectures;
  • design classrooms: when drawing and designing is the core of the lecture;
  • pattern-­‐cutting studios: where sewing machines, irons, dummies and other features can be used for the pattern making lectures;
  • computer rooms

PARKING & ACCESS

Two large public parking areas are located next to the school. The school does not have allocated parking.

CAMPUS SAFETY & SECURITY

The school has the utmost concern for the safety of each student, faculty member, and staff. All students, employees, and visitors should promptly report crimes in progress, accidents, and any other emergencies to local law enforcement by dialing 911.

CAMPUS SAFETY

student keycard access

For security reasons students access the school buildings by showing their student keycard which has to be swiped at the entrance, and on exit, via the bar-­‐code readers provided.

Should the student forget their card, reception staff will allow access only after manual registration and demonstration of validated ID. In case of loss, a one time duplicate card will be issued free of charge. Any additional duplicate cards requested will be subject to an administrative fee of $20.00 for each card.

In order to keep students, their belongings and the schools resources safe at all times. Istituto Marangoni Miami requests that entry is not allowed to anyone other than Istituto Marangoni students and staff, unless expressed permission has been granted by school staff

MAJOR POLICY STATEMENTS

This section of the school catalog outlines policies and procedures relevant to students enrolled at Istituto Marangoni Miami.

HEALTH AND SAFETY

The school acknowledges that it is its duty to ensure, so far as reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of the students, staff, and anyone else who comes to the school. It is the policy of the school to provide and maintain, as far as reasonably practical, a working environment that is safe and without risk to health.

Consequently, the school will, when reasonably practical:

  • provide and maintain safe and healthy working conditions;
  • provide and maintain safe machinery;
  • provide information, training and supervision to enable staff and students to perform their work safely;
  • maintain high standards of health, safety and welfare in all School

FREEDOM OF ACCESS / NON DISCRIMINATION

Istituto   Marangoni   Miami   is   open   to   all   students   who   are   qualified   according   to   the   published admission standards. The School encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes, from all  cultural,  racial,  religious,  and  ethnic  groups.  The  School  is  committed  to  non-­‐discrimination  with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, veteran status, political affiliations or opinions. All School employees have a responsibility to maintain their work free of discrimination.

All acts of discrimination must be documented in writing, specifying the basis for discrimination. The complainant must enumerate all types of discrimination in the statement, identify the offender, and turn in the complaint to School Officers. In absence of a written complaint, the employee or faculty member who received the complaint must document it in a memorandum to be referred to Student Development or Human Resources, as appropriate. Unless the complainant signs it, it will be an informal complaint.

Istituto Marangoni Miami will investigate all complaints. Investigations may include interviews, preparation of statements, reports with summary of the investigation, description of investigation process, findings and recommendations. Reports will be kept confidential.

The School may attempt conciliation between the parties involved. If conciliation is not achieved, the designated official from the school will issue a formal report. Final reports shall be issued within 60 days of receiving the complaint. The alleged offender and complainant will be notified in writing of the outcomes, and procedures for appeal. Upon this final report, corrective action, including sanctions, will be considered and implemented.

Claims to be found frivolous will result in appropriate sanctions against the complainant, as determined by the program leaders. Possible sanctions may include, but are not limited to written reprimands on the student or employee’s record, restriction or loss of privileges, and suspension. Complaints may be withdrawn, but Istituto Marangoni Miami reserves the right to continue investigating as it was made aware of a possible act of discrimination. Any attempt(s) at retaliation shall be treated as a separate allegation of discrimination.

By  the  time  a  determination  of  appropriate  disciplinary  action  or  resolution  has  been  reached,  all parties   will   have   been   contacted   and   circumstances   will   have   been   fully   evaluated.   However, individuals  have  five  days  to  appeal  determination  of  sanctions.  Such  appeals  shall  be  directed  to  the school director which will re-­‐evaluate the determination as deemed appropriate.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY

Integrity is essential to an educational institution and to the entire educational experience. Individual students, faculty, and staff members must affirm this quality. The importance of integrity and ethics is an integral part of life at Istituto Marangoni Miami.

The Academic Integrity Policy requires that all members of the School conduct themselves honestly in all endeavors. Therefore, cheating, plagiarism and other acts contrary to academic integrity are unacceptable and will not be tolerated at Istituto Marangoni Miami. Appropriate action will be taken against dishonest students, faculty, staff, and administrators.

Self-­‐expression  is  also  an  essential  component  to  a  rewarding  and  fulfilling  educational  experience.  A school  setting  is  an  ideal  forum  for  self-­‐expression,  voicing  disagreement  and  challenging  accepted traditions.  However,    while  the  goal  of  the  School  is  to  educate  and  encourage,  it  also  must  curtail behavior  that  adversely  affects  others.  As  such,  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami’s  policies  require  that  such self  -­‐  expression,  although  encouraged,  must  be  delivered    in  a  civil  manner,  exhibiting  respect  for others at all times.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE

Istituto Marangoni Miami as an institution of higher education is dedicated to the well being of all members of the students, faculty, employees, and administrators. In demonstration of its concern with the misuse of alcohol and other drugs, it is the policy of Istituto Marangoni Miami to prevent substance abuse through education and prevention. The School recognizes alcoholism and drug abuse as an illness or treatable disorder, and it is the School’s policy to work with members of the school community to provide channels of education and assistance. However, it is the responsibility of the individual to seek assistance. The School also recognizes that the possession and/or use of certain substances are illegal, and the School is obligated to comply with local, state, and federal laws.

Istituto Marangoni Miami’s alcohol and drug policies are as follows:

While on, or engaged in any school related-­‐activity, members of the school community must be in a fit condition to perform appropriately. Being under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is prohibited and may subject the individual to disciplinary action, including the possibility of dismissal.

TOBACCO USE POLICY

The School wants to promote a healthful and clean work environment for students, employees, staff and visitors. In accordance with Florida’s Clean Air Act (FCIAA), smoking is prohibited in all School buildings. This includes, but is not limited to, any classroom, laboratory, library, faculty office, administrative offices, dining facility, or any other facility owned or controlled by the School. School administrators may subject to disciplinary action as well as any students, faculty members, or staff found in violation of this policy.

POLICY AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT

It is the intent of Istituto Marangoni Miami to protect all employees and students from sexual harassment. Not only is sexual harassment a violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, it also undermines the integrity of the employment and academic environment, debilitates morale, and interferes with the effectiveness of employees and students. In accordance with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s published guidelines, unwelcome sexual advances, unwanted requests for favors of a sexual nature, and any other unwanted verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature are considered sexual harassment if:

  • Explicit or implicit submission to sexual overtures is made a term or condition of employment;
  • Employment decisions are made on the basis of whether submission to or rejection of sexual overtures occurred; and
  • Sexually intimidating, hostile, or offensive  atmosphere  unreasonably  interferes  with  an individual’s work

At Istituto Marangoni Miami, sexual harassment of or by employees includes the following:

  • Unwelcome or unwanted sexual advances. This includes unwelcome physical contact or sexual advances considered unacceptable by another individual;
  • Requests or demands for sexual This includes subtle or blatant pressures or requests for any type of sexual favor, accompanied by an implied or stated promise of preferential treatment or negative consequence concerning one’s employment status or student status;
  • Verbal abuse that  is  sexually  oriented  or  considered  unacceptable  by  another  individual,  as  well  as sexually  derogatory  comments.  This  includes  commenting  about  an  individual’s  body  or  appearance when such comments go or other tasteless sexually-­‐oriented comments or innuendoes or actions that offend  others;  Engaging  in  any  type  of  sexually  oriented  conduct  that  would  unreasonably  interfere with another’s work performance. This includes extending unwanted sexual attention to someone that reduces personal productivity or time available to work at assigned tasks; or
  • Creating a work environment that is intimidating, hostile, or offensive because of unwelcome or unwanted sexually oriented conversations, suggestions, requests, demands, physical contacts, or
  • Normal, non-­‐coercive interaction  that  is  acceptable  to  both  parties  is  not  considered  to  be  sexual harassment.  At  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami,  sexual  harassment  by  employees  of  students  is  defined  as unwelcome  sexual    advances,  requests  for  sexual  favors,  and  other  verbal  or  physical  conduct  of  a sexual nature when:
    • Submission to such conduct is made to appear to be a term or condition of enrollment, attendance, or participation in a class;
    • Submission to or rejection of such conduct affects academic decisions;
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with a student’s academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive academic environment;
  • Unwelcome physical contact, including but not limited to, patting, pinching, or touching; or Offensive or demeaning sexual remarks, jokes, or

Students aggrieved by a violation of this policy may file a grievance by reporting the conduct to the School Director. All allegations of sexual harassment of or by a student, faculty member, or any other School personnel will be promptly and thoroughly investigated by the School Officers.

Istituto Marangoni Miami recognizes sexual harassment as an insidious practice and will not tolerate sexual harassment in any manner or form. Persons sexually harassing others will be dealt with swiftly and vigorously. Any individual who violates any portion of this policy shall be subject to disciplinary action up to and including discharge.

It is improper conduct for an Istituto Marangoni Miami faculty member to engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with a student enrolled in the faculty member’s class or for an employee to engage in a romantic or sexual relationship with a student that is under the employee’s supervision. Romantic or sexual relationships between any faculty member and a student then enrolled in the faculty member’s class (including supervised student activities for which academic credit is given) or between any school employee and a student enrolled in the school may appear to be coercive and are discouraged. Even when no coercion is present, such relationships create an appearance of impropriety and favoritism, which can impair the academic experience of all students in the school environment. At Istituto Marangoni Miami, romantic and sexual relationships between a faculty member or  an employee and a student are subject to the prohibition against sexual harassment.

POLICY AGAINST HAZING

In compliance with Florida law, Istituto Marangoni Miami defines hazing as any act whether physical, mental, emotional or psychological, which subjects another person, voluntarily or involuntarily, to anything that may abuse, mistreat, degrade, humiliate, harass, or intimidate him or her, or which may in any fashion compromise his/her inherent dignity as a person. Hazing is inherently in conflict with the purpose and goals of Istituto Marangoni Miami. Therefore, such conduct will not be tolerated. Every effort will be made by Istituto Marangoni Miami to guarantee that hazing will not victimize students.

LIBRARY USE POLICY

The library’s policy regarding student borrowing and return of items is posted in the library. Students are allowed and encouraged to borrow materials from the library’s general collection. Students are allowed to borrow materials for up to 24 hours. These materials may also be renewed for a period of 24 hours. Fines and late fees are assessed for late items at the rate of 25 cents per book per day. Students are charged replacement value up to a cost of $50 for any item that is lost. These fees are collected before the student is allowed to register for the next semester’s classes.

COMPUTER USE POLICY

Istituto Marangoni Miami’s computing facilities are provided for the use of registered users. All computer users are responsible for using the facilities in an effective, efficient, ethical and lawful manner. The School views the use of computer facilities as a privilege, not a right, and seeks to protect legitimate computer users by imposing sanctions on those who abuse the privilege.

This policy provides guidelines for the appropriate and inappropriate use of the computing resources of Istituto Marangoni Miami. It applies to all users of the School’s computing resources,  including students, faculty, employees, alumni and guests of the School. Computing resources include all computers, related equipment, software, data and local area networks for which the School is responsible.

The computing resources of Istituto Marangoni Miami are intended for the legitimate business of the School. All users must have proper authorization for the use of the School’s computing resources. Users are responsible for seeing that these computing resources are used in an effective, ethical and legal manner. Users must apply standards of acceptable academic and professional ethics and considerate conduct to their use of the School’s computing resources. Users must be aware of the legal and moral responsibility for ethical conduct in the use of computing resources. Users have a responsibility not to abuse the network and resources and to respect the privacy, copyrights and intellectual property rights of others.

Computer  hardware  and  software  is  the  property  of  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami  and  the  student  is responsible  for  taking  precautions  against  importing  computer  viruses  or  doing  other  harm  to  the computer. It is prohibited to copy school-­‐purchased or leased software.

EMAIL AND INTERNET POLICY

All email communications sent or received at the school should be considered official school correspondence. Such correspondence is subject to standards of good taste, propriety, courtesy and consideration. The school under certain circumstances, such as an internal investigation, may retrieve emails, as they are subject to subpoena and discovery in legal proceedings. Respect for others’ privacy dictates that students should not try to access another individual’s messages without the individual’s permission.

Most computers at Istituto Marangoni Miami have access to the Internet. It is expected that all individuals using Istituto Marangoni Miami’s computers will use good judgment in determining the sites visited and the amount of time spent using the Internet.

RULES REGARDING THE USE OF COMPUTERS

The following rules apply to all users of the Istituto Marangoni Miami’s computers. Violations of any of these rules may be possibly unlawful. An individual’s computer use privileges may be suspended immediately upon the discovery of a possible violation of these rules:

  1. Computer users agree to use facilities and accounts for School related activities
  2. Accounts are considered the property of Istituto Marangoni
  3. An Istituto Marangoni Miami Officer must approve all access to central computer systems, including the issuing of
  4. Authorization for the use of the accounts is given for specific academic
  5. Attempts to use accounts without authorization or to use accounts for other than their intended purposes are all violations of the School’s
  6. Electronic communications  facilities,  such  as  E-­‐MAIL  are  for  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami  related activities only. Fraudulent, harassing or obscene messages and/or materials are not to be sent or store
  7. Computer users agree to the proprietary rights of Computer software protected by copyright is not to be copied from, into, or by using Istituto Marangoni Miami computers.
  8. Computers users  are   required   to   abide   by   federal  copyright  laws  and   Istituto   Marangoni Miami’s policy regarding the use of all digital materials, including peer-­‐to-­‐peer file sharing.

The School Director will address inappropriate conduct and violations of this policy. In cases where a user violates any of the terms of this policy, the School may, in addition to other remedies, temporarily or permanently deny access to any and all Istituto Marangoni Miami’s computing resources and appropriate disciplinary actions may be taken.

REGISTERING COMPLAINTS AGAINST SCHOOL STAFF GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

If any student deems it necessary to file a grievance against an Istituto Marangoni Miami employee, he or she must report such incident to the Academic Service & Student Support Office. Every effort will be made to protect the privacy of any parties involved. The student is entitled and encouraged to have an informal discussion with the Director of Education as a first step. If an informal conversation does not result in a satisfactory resolution, or if you are not comfortable speaking about the matter with the Director of Education, then the student should discuss the situation with the School Director. In cases of discrimination or sexual harassment, Istituto Marangoni Miami encourages the student to go directly to the School Director. Any complaint that is not in writing, that is, a verbal complaint, is considered an informal complaint.

After an informal discussion, if the student wishes to file a formal grievance, he/she may submit such in writing to the School Director. However, before filing a formal charge, the complaining party should first make a good faith effort to meet and confer with the party against whom he or  she  has a complaint in an effort to resolve the matter. The formal report should contain a statement of the problem or complaint, the facts and details of the situation, pertinent dates and the names and positions of the parties involved. The grievance must be signed and dated. Also, the student may withdraw a complaint at any time during the complaint process. A withdrawal must be made in writing to the School Director.

Upon receipt of a written formal complaint by a student, the School Director will consider the complaint. After such an investigation, the School Director will make a determination as to whether the grievance has merit as alleged. If the alleged grievance is deemed justified, Istituto Marangoni Miami will take whatever steps it deems appropriate to correct any grievance suffered by the complaining student.

Istituto Marangoni Miami recognizes that students may have legitimate complaints relating to their course, the services or facilities provided, other students, or the staff and it will take such complaints seriously and deal with them in confidence and without recrimination. All students have also a right to appeal to review their results.

Please, note that all students should access their IM email account on a regular basis, as it will be used to communicate important information regarding their course, tuition fees, award ceremonies and other matters, including Exceptional Factors claims, complaints, and appeals.

Istituto Marangoni Miami wants students to experience good learning opportunities and services. It expects that they will inform academic staff when any aspect of the learning opportunities or services it provides do not match what they were led to believe they would experience. The School views complaints by students as important feedback: when things are not right it encourages students to complain constructively, so that it can remedy matters as quickly as possible, so that the School can enhance what it offers students and so that the effects on students’ learning and progress are minimized.

  • Grievance Procedure Response Time Frame: 30 days from Initial Investigation and 60 days for final determination.
  • Students who feel a grievance is unresolved may refer their grievance to Executive Director, Commission for Independent Education, 325 West Gaines Street, Suite #1414, Tallahassee, FL 32399-­‐ 0400, 850.245.3200 or toll free at 888.224.6684.”

REMEDIES

If it is determined that such grievance has appropriate support, the persons or departments that are responsible for such violation will be dealt with in an appropriate manner by the supervisors or directors of such persons or programs, in accordance with applicable provisions, if any, of contracts, employment regulations, faculty and employee handbooks, or the like.

REVIEW BY A REPRESENTATIVE COMMITTEE

The student may appeal this determination to an appeals committee consisting of members of the administration, faculty and student body. This committee has the right to review the determinations and to reverse or amend such decisions.

STUDENT CONDUCT

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE

The following are examples of misconduct for which students and/or student organizations are subject to disciplinary action by Istituto Marangoni Miami. This list should not be considered inclusive.

Dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to the School. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of School documents, records, or identification.

Theft of and/or damage to property of the School, of a member of the School community or of a visitor to the School.

Unauthorized entry to, or use of, School facilities, which are locked, closed to student activities or otherwise restricted as to use.

Tampering with fire equipment, exit lights, fire alarms, or any other Safety equipment or structures.

Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expression on School owned property or at School sponsored or supervised activities.

Abusive behavior -­‐ Any action or situation which produces mental or physical discomfort for any member of the School community, or which places the individual or group in danger of physical or mental injury. This behavior includes but is not limited to:

Sexual Harassment -­‐ inappropriate or unwelcome sexual attention to coerced sexual relations or sexual assault (also see policy on Sexual    Harassment).

Verbal Harassment-­‐statements incorporating abusive, obscene or threatening language. Physical Harassment -­‐ use of, or threatened use of, physical force or violence.

Stalking -­‐  willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly following or harassing another person.

Any harassment on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, religion, or sexual orientation.

Forging, altering, possessing, duplicating, or using documents, keys, records, or identifications without consent or authorization.

Failing to comply with a judicial sanction, to include violation of specific probationary statutes.

Purporting to or representing another person, an organization, or the School improperly without the consent or authority.

Lying or perjuring self to School official.

Attendance during the commitment of a violation of the School student conduct code constitutes permission or condoning of the act.

Possessing, consuming, dispensing, or being under the influence of alcoholic beverages or illegal drugs in violation of the State of Florida Law or Istituto Marangoni Miami’s policy.

Violating the School smoking tobacco use policy in specified facilities.

Soliciting/selling for personal or organizational profit without proper consent of School officials.

Disruption of the normal activities of the institution, including physical violence or abuse of any person or conduct which threatens or endangers the health or safety of persons, the deliberate interference with academic freedom and freedom of speech.

Possession of weapons, which include firearms (or replicas), guns, sling shot devices, grenades, knives, explosives, flammable materials or any other instrument that may be used to cause injury to body or damage to property.

Violation of other published School policies, rules or regulations.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM

Istituto Marangoni Miami refers to the Turnitin Online Platform. Turnitin’s Originality Check helps instructors check students’ work for improper citation or potential plagiarism by comparing it against the world’s most accurate text comparison database. All student work will be verified for authenticity before it is submitted to the professor. Cheating is defined as the attempt, successful or not, to give or obtain aid and/or information by illicit means in meeting any academic requirements, including examinations. Cheating includes falsifying reports and documents. Plagiarism is defined as the use, without proper acknowledgment, of the ideas, phrases, sentences, or larger units of discourse from another writer or speaker. Plagiarism includes the unauthorized copying of software and the violation of copyright laws.

An incident of Cheating or Plagiarism upon which a faculty member may take action will be an event which the faculty member witnesses or has written evidence to support. A faculty member must observe this evidence directly and may not take action solely on the report of another party.

Academic Misconduct refers to any form of academic cheating and collusion. Examples include:

  • Plagiarism (presenting the work of others as if it were your own);
  • Submitting assignments downloaded from the internet;
  • Commissioning another person to produce a piece of work without acknowledgement;
  • Cheating in examinations;
  • Colluding with others to submit work (including friends or family).

Plagiarism is the most common form of cheating and is defined as stealing another person’s ideas and presenting them as though they were your own.

Some examples include:

  • Copying from a textbook, journal article, thesis, essay or website without providing adequate reference to the author;
  • Reproducing original artwork, designs, film, sound or performance and presenting them as though they were your own;
  • Copying someone else’s program, database, webpage or multimedia presentation without acknowledging their

Throughout studies, students will be encouraged to reference the work of other artists, writers, designers or performers.

Faculty will expect to find reference to the sources of your ideas in supporting documentation, such as sketchbooks or initial drafts. This is an essential and valuable part of your education.

As long as the source of the ideas is acknowledged, this is not plagiarism. There are different ways of doing this, for example:

  • In an essay or assignment, when quoting another person’s words “put their words in quotation marks” and properly reference the author within the text and in the bibliography;
  • In computer software show where the information has come from in the acknowledgements or credits, e.g. ‘program design

– A. Brown’, or ‘graphics – J. Smith’;

  • When using an artifact, put a caption against the object, e.g. ‘original photograph by Cartier-­Bresson’;
  • If presenting an original piece of work based on an existing design or work of art, quote the source, e.g. ‘after Rodin’, ‘after Eckersley’;
  • If using a strategy of ‘appropriation’ (i.e. the deliberate and conscious use of the style and images of another artist) make sure you tell your Faculty what you are doing and why and acknowledge the strategy when submitting work for assessment;
  • In a group project make sure all the members of the group are listed. If individuals undertake specific work within the project, make sure that this is acknowledged;
  • In examinations do not copy another person’s Do not quote passages from a textbook or journal without acknowledging the source.

Failure to acknowledge the use of another person’s ideas in your work may be considered a breach of the School’s Academic Regulations; it may also constitute a breach of intellectual property rights, e.g. copyright. Such an offense is likely to lead to failure of that assignment and/or unit and serious or repeated offences may lead to failure of the whole stage of the course, suspension or even expulsion.

In addition, a breach of copyright may lead to legal action.

PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM

Any faculty member discovering a case of suspected cheating or plagiarism should make a responsible effort to confront the student with the evidence within five (5) working days. If the student can explain the incident to the satisfaction of the faculty member, no further action is warranted.

If the student denies cheating and the faculty member continues to believe cheating has occurred, the faculty member will send an Academic Dishonesty Form to the Program Leader (or director of education) of the appropriate area of study. This form is available in the office of the Director of Education. The Director of Education will hold a hearing in which the faculty member will present the evidence against the student, the student will also be present at the meeting. The Director of Education will decide who, in addition to the above, may be present at the hearing. The Director of Education will determine whether or not the evidence indicates that cheating/plagiarism has taken place.

If the student has admitted or has been found guilty of cheating or plagiarism, the following records will be kept:

  • The faculty member will send an Academic Dishonesty Form to the Director of
  • The Director of Education will inform the student in writing that these forms have been
  • Records of the incident will be kept in the Office of the Director of

This record shall be destroyed upon graduation or other forms of separation from the School if no further incidents of cheating or plagiarism occur.

If the records, in the Office of the Director of Education, indicate that the student has committed two offenses, both incidents become part of the student’s permanent academic record.

The faculty member shall decide how the student will be graded for the course in which cheating or plagiarism occurred. The student may be required to resubmit the assignment or take a new examination. The student may receive a failing grade on the assignment or examination in question. The student may receive a failing grade for the course.

For a second or subsequent offense, the student shall be subject to suspension or dismissal from Istituto Marangoni Miami.

The student may appeal any of the above decisions in writing to the Director of Education within ten working days.

RESPONSIBILITIES STUDENTS CONCERNING ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Students are responsible for knowing the policies regarding cheating and plagiarism and the penalties for such behavior. Failure of an individual faculty member to remind the student as to what constitutes cheating and plagiarism does not relieve the student of this responsibility. Students must take care not to provide opportunities for others to cheat. Students must inform the faculty member if cheating or plagiarism is taking place.

DISCIPLINARY STANDINGS

A student’s status with regard to discipline is regulated by the following definitions, which are reflected in each student’s record kept at the Registration Department.

GOOD STANDING

The status of good standing indicates that a student has been duly enrolled in the School and is eligible to participate in all activities of the School. A student is presumed to be in good standing unless the student engages in an established misconduct.

WARNING

This status indicates that a student has been through the judicial process due to the seriousness of his/her conduct and has been cautioned that further behavior of the same or similar type will be cause for further disciplinary  action by Istituto Marangoni Miami.

DISCIPLINARY PROBATION

This status indicates that the student’s behavior has raised serious questions concerning the student’s status as a member of the School community. The student will be given a stated period during which his/her conduct will establish whether he/she is to be returned to good standing by having met definite requirements in behavior or whether he/she is to be suspended or dismissed from Istituto Marangoni Miami. The Director of Education may impose the sanction of disciplinary probation on a student.

A statement of offense and decision will be placed in the student’s file in the Registration Department. If while on disciplinary probation a student is found responsible for a further infraction of School policies/regulations, the student will be subject to the possibility of suspension/expulsion from Istituto Marangoni Miami.

SUSPENSION

The  status  of  suspension  indicates  the  suspension/separation  of  the  student  from  Istituto  Marangoni Miami for a stated time due to serious or repeated violations of the rules or for undesirable conduct on the  part  of  the  student.  A  student  will  be  permitted  to  re-­‐register  for  courses  after  a  semester probation period. The Director of Education  may impose suspension.

Statement of offense and decision will be placed in the student’s file in the Registration Department.

EXPULSION

The School Director reserves the right to expel a student in cases of serious infraction of disciplinary rules.

This status, the most serious disciplinary action taken by the School, indicates the immediate, involuntary and permanent separation of a student from Istituto Marangoni Miami because of established gross misconduct on the part of a student.

After notice of expulsion, a student must leave the campus immediately. The expelled student does not have the privilege to apply for readmission to Istituto Marangoni Miami. Statement of offense and decision will be placed in the student’s file in the Registration Department. A student’s transcript will include documentation of expulsion.

APPEALS TO DISCIPLINARY STANDINGS

A student may appeal any of the above decisions in writing to the Director of Education within 10 working days.

DISCIPLINARY RECORDS

Istituto Marangoni Miami will retain disciplinary records for one year after graduation. The School reserves the right to keep records for a longer period of time if so specified in the sanction letter.

STUDENT SERVICES

Under the supervision of the Director of Education, the School student services are in place to assist students with their various needs. The goal of effective and worthwhile student services is to assist students and to directly involve the students in the affairs of the institution, fostering a sense of community among students, faculty and administration.

Istituto Marangoni Miami provides Student Service Officers, who can act as the first point of contact for students who may require counseling on personal issues.

At the beginning of each semester, Student Service Officer and the Librarian will give presentations on various aspects of the study at Istituto Marangoni Miami, e.g. examinations, attendance monitoring, library resources, managing their time, dealing with stress, exam tips.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

As previously mentioned, Istituto Marangoni Miami is an institution that emphasizes not only academic and professional growth, but also personal development and the nurturing of each student. Coordinators serve as liaisons between students and the faculty/administration. It is the role of the Student Service Officers and Program Leaders to advise and mentor students with regards to academic and professional decisions. In addition, each faculty member is receptive to developing a professional, yet personal relationship with each student. As such, the students should feel comfortable, if the need arises, to seek advice of a faculty member with regards to academic and professional matters.

PLACEMENT SERVICES

Istituto Marangoni Miami Career Service Office provides career support for students at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The purpose of the Career Service is to bridge the gap between Istituto Marangoni Miami and the job market. To do so, mentoring and counseling activities are organized throughout the academic year. These comprise of workshop to be delivered within the classrooms, and individual meetings with eligible students.

During   these   individual   meetings,   Resumes   /   CVs   and   portfolios   are   revised   and   students   are encouraged to talk about their career goals and expectations, while being advised on professional paths and on strategies to tackle the working world. In order to further enhance job market knowledge, the Career Service organizes seminars and round table discussions with fashion professionals, HR managers and head-­‐hunters, usually on specific topics such as: career paths, personnel research methods and job figures.  Internship  opportunities  may  be  offered  to  graduates. Upon  successful completion  of  studies, the  Career  Service  supports  alumni  in  the  search  for  opportunities  and  recruitment  initiatives  for  one year after their graduation. Companies addressing their recruitment needs to Istituto Marangoni Miami Career Service are offered a pre-­‐selection of profiles that are suitable for their vacancies.

The Career Service also researches and develops additional contacts within the working world, for collaborations and resume/CV proposals to companies. Istituto Marangoni Miami does not guarantee employment.

STUDENT WITH DISABILITIES

Istituto Marangoni Miami does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admission or access to, or operations of, its programs or activities.

This   notice   is   provided   as   required   by   Title   II   of   the   Americans   with   Disabilities   Act   of   1990. Accommodations  are  granted  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis  for  those  students  who  are  eligible  by  showing sufficient  documentation  of  disability  in  compliance  with  all  Federal  and  State  Laws.  The  school administrators  will  handle  provisions  of  accommodations  for  students  with  disabilities  in  compliance with  Section  504  of  the  Rehabilitation  Act  of  1973  and  the  Americans  with  Disabilities  Act  of  1990. Reasonable   and   specific   accommodations   are   developed   with   each   student   based   on   current documentation  from  an  appropriate  licensed  professional.  All  accommodations  are  individualized, flexible, and confidential based on the nature of the disability and the academic environment.

The school currently provides handicap access in its classrooms and facilities. Requests for other accommodations must be made to the Director of Education. On occasion, the Director of Education may work together with the School Director to resolve requests concerning academic adjustments.

With the goal of promoting integration and equality among the student population, the School provides individual assistance to students with documented disabilities. Disclosure of disability is voluntary. Students with disabilities must request adjustments or other accommodations prior to the admissions/enrollment time frame of each semester, and provide appropriate documentation to the Director of Education. Documentation received may be questioned if proper credentials are not provided, or if the diagnosis is without supporting data. The School maintains all records as confidential.

Upon review of the documentation, the Director of Education will develop a letter of acknowledgement of the disability and the appropriate accommodations that will be provided to the student. The Director of Education will contact the student’s professors to notify them of the authorized adjustments. In case the adjustments do not work, the student must notify Director of Education in order to ensure timely arrangements.

Students that require extra time for testing may take examinations under the supervision of the Director of Education, in agreement with the course professor. Students should allow two to three weeks for processing of additional aids or educational materials. The School provides these auxiliary aids and services on an individual basis. These aids and services may include, but are not limited to: registration assistance, approval of reduced course load, letters to instructors outlining accommodation needs, note takers, testing accommodations, classroom and other facility accommodations, and assistance with accessibility issues.

Istituto Marangoni Miami will take into account the dates of requests for adjustments in the evaluation of grade appeals. Students should keep in mind that arrangements are provided to aid in the completion of course requirements, not to provide excuses for missing assignments or other coursework. All students may appeal grades. For this process, please refer to Procedure for Grade Appeals.

APPEAL DISABILITY DOCUMENTATION DECISION

The student may appeal any decision related to a requested accommodation or auxiliary aid to the Director of Education who will respond to the students appeal not later than ten (1O) days upon submission of a students appeal. Such an appeal must be made in writing to the Director of Education not later than ten (1O) days following the decision as to a requested accommodation or aid. Any position paper, brief, medical documentation or other written material, which the student desires to be reviewed by the Director of Education, shall be submitted together with the notice of appeal. The Director of Education shall investigate and respond to the notice of appeal in writing, stating the decision, together with the reasons for either affirming or reversing the previous decision as to an accommodation or auxiliary aid.

FINANCIAL AIDS / SCHOLARSHIPS

Istituto Marangoni Miami is not currently offering Financial Aid or Scholarship.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS ADMISSIONS

  • High school diploma, GED, or evidence of secondary education
  • Completed enrollment agreement,
  • $100 non-­‐refundable application fee,
  • Updated resume/cv,
  • Personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

 

ACADEMIC REGISTRATION, REGULATIONS AND COURSE SELECTION

A schedule of courses is published and distributed at the Student Services approximately one  week prior to advance registration for each semester. Please note that the information contained in the schedule is subject to change at any time. Students should confirm the information prior to registration.

Returning students may register during early registration period or regular registration periods. Please consult the Academic Calendar for the dates. On the dates set forth in the Academic Calendar, students must register for courses offered by the School. Before students are eligible for registration, they must have undergone academic advisement.

Students may register by completing the registration forms and delivering such forms in person to the Admissions Office.

DROP/ADD PERIOD

Students may make schedule changes by filing a drop/add request form with the Registration Department during the drop/add period. The end of the first week of classes is the last day for adding and changing courses. Please see the academic calendar for specific dates.

UNDERGRADUATE TUITION, FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES

Program Credit Hours Total Per Credit Hour Total Cost Application Fee Graduation Fee Total Including Fees *
Bachelor of Arts Fashion Design 120 $ 1200 $ 144,000 $ 100 $ 250 $144,350
Bachelor of Arts Fashion Business 120 $ 1200 $ 144,000 $ 100 $ 250 $144,350
Bachelors of Arts Fashion Styling 120 $ 1200 $ 144,000 $ 100 $ 250 $144,350
Associates of Art Fashion Studies 60 $ 1200 $ 72,000 $ 100 $ 250 $ 72,350

* See Academic Calendar for dates. An initial registration after the end of the Drop/Add period will incur a $100 late registration fee.

Tuition and other registration fees are due on or before the last day to register for any given semester. Students should consult the Academic Calendar regarding thedeadline. Students will not be officially enrolled in Istituto Marangoni Miami until all fees are fully paid. Any students owing money to Istituto Marangoni Miami, regardless of the debt, will not be permitted to register.

Books and materials for BA programs

Students on full-­‐time programs will need to cover the cost of books and materials for an estimated cost from  $1,000 / $1,500 per year.  Year 3 and year 4 Fashion Design programs include the development of collections and/or portfolios, all additional material costs are covered by the student.

Secondary fees (2017/18)

Application fee $100 (non-­‐refundable) Late Payment Fee* $100
Late Registration Fee* $100 Reinstatement fee $100 Graduation fee $250
Transfer courses review fee $350 Library Item loss fee $50
Student Card second duplicate fee $20 Official Transcript request fee $25 Non-­‐official Transcript request fee $5

* See Academic Calendar for dates. An initial registration after the end of the Drop/Add period will incur a $100 late registration fee.

PAYMENT METHODS

The Academic Calendar will indicate the Payment Due Date for tuition and fees. Tuition and fees may be paid by credit card, check or money order at the Admissions Department. On or before the last day of the Registration Period, the students should have paid in full.

Payment by installments is currently not accepted at the Istituto Marangoni Miami School. In exceptional circumstances an alternative payment schedule may be discussed and agreed at the discretion of the School Director.

The application fee must be paid upon initial enrollment. For other students the payment of the tuition fee should be received:

  • ∙ no later than 30 days before the first day of courses starting Fall 2017
  • ∙ no later than 30 days before the first day for courses starting Spring 2018 The application fee is not refundable.

Textbooks are not included in the tuition fee. Students will be given advance notice to purchase any required textbooks for study. A full list of books and recommended reading can also be found on the Program Outlines.

REGISTRATION CANCELLATION FOR NON PAYMENT

Failure to pay tuition in full by the payment due dates set forth by the individual student will result in the School’s cancellation of the student’s registration for that year.

Students   cancelled   for   non-­‐payment   of   fees   have   the   following   options:   Reinstatement   requires immediate  fee  payment  in  full  using  a  Webcheck  or  credit  card  plus  a  $100  late  payment  and  a  $100 reinstatement  fee. Reinstatement  after  the  cancellation  of  classes  requires  an  appeal  to  be  filed  with the Admissions Office.

ACADEMIC REGULATION AND PROCEDURES DROP/ADD PERIOD

Students who drop individual courses during the drop/add period specified in the Academic Calendar will receive a total refund for the tuition and fees for the course.

For fall and spring semesters, students may add or drop courses during the first week of the term without incurring a fee and without receiving a “W” on the transcript for dropped courses. The Friday of the first week of the semester is typically the last day for adding/dropping courses and changing sections, but refer to the Academic Calendar, as the last day for the drop/add period may vary.

AFTER DROP/ADD PERIOD

Students who drop a course after the drop/add period will not receive a refund unless the drop takes place due to exceptional circumstances, such as illness, military conscription or death of an immediate family member. Situations such as employment changes, relocation of home, transportation problems, dislike for the instructor/course, etc., are not considered “exceptional circumstances.”

DROP/ADD PROCEDURE

To drop an individual course or courses but remain enrolled in the School, students must complete and file a change of status from the Admissions Office.

CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY

Students are advised that if they choose to make monthly tuition payments, the student must complete payments for the entire semester prior to the subsequent registrations being accepted. Should the student either drop a course(s) or withdraw from a course, the student is required to notify the Records/Registrar’s office by using the appropriate form and submitting that form to the aforementioned office. Should the student be terminated or cancel their registration for any reason, the student understands that all refunds will be made according to the following refund schedule:

Should a student’s enrollment be terminated or cancelled for any reason, all funds will be made according to the following refund schedule:

  1. Cancellation can be made in person, by electronic mail, by Certified Mail or by
  2. All monies will be refunded if the School does not accept the applicant or if the student cancels within three (3) Business Days after signing the Enrollment Agreement, and making initial
  3. Cancellation after the third (3rd) Business Day, but before the first class, will result in a refund of all monies paid, with the exception of the registration fee, not to exceed $150.00.
  4. Full-­‐time students:  cancellation  after  attendance  has  begun  follows  the  drop/add  procedure. Students  who  drop  a  course  after  the  drop/add  period  (one  week  from  the  start  of  classes)  will  not receive a refund unless the drop takes place due to exceptional circumstances, such as illness, military conscription  or  death  of  an  immediate  family  member.  Situations  such  as  employment  changes, relocation of home, transportation problems, dislike for the instructor/course, etc., are not considered “exceptional   circumstances.”   (For   more   information,   see   paragraph   10.   Exceptional   Circumstance Withdrawal below.)
  5. Students other  than  full-­‐time:  cancellation  after  attendance  has  begun,  but  prior  to  20% completion of the coursework the student is enrolled for, will result in a Pro Rata refund computed on the percentage of coursework completed.
  6. Students other than full-­‐time: cancellation after completing 20% of the program will not receive a refund unless the cancellation takes place due to exceptional circumstances.
  7. Termination Date: When calculating the refund due to a student, the last date of actual attendance by the student is used in the calculation unless earlier written notice was
  8. Refunds will be made within 30 days of termination of the student’s enrollment or receipt of a Cancellation Notice from the
  9. Under a Pro Rata Refund Calculation, the School is entitled to retain only the percentage of charges (tuition, fees, used books, etc.) proportional to the period of enrollment completed by the
  10. Exceptional Circumstance Withdrawal (also includes Medical Withdrawal, with Doctors note)

COURSE LOAD

Undergraduate Students -­‐ Full time students are those students who are registered for at least 12 credit hours in the fall and spring semester. Three quarter time students are those who are registered for a minimum of 9 credits and a maximum of 11 credits. Half time students are those who are registered for a minimum of 6 credits and a maximum of 8 credits. Less than half time students are those who are registered for a minimum of 1 credit and a maximum of 5 credits. In the summer semester, those students who are registered for at least 12 credit hours will be deemed full time students.

Students who drop courses during a semester and reduce their course Ioad, will be classified in accordance with their reduced course load.

Graduate Students -­‐ Full time students are those students who are registered for at least 8 credit hours in the fall and spring semester. Half time students are those who are registered for a minimum of 4 credit hours. Less than half time students are those who are registered for a minimum of 1 credit and a maximum of 3 credits. In the summer semester, those students who are registered for at least 9 credit hours will be deemed full time students.

ATTENDANCE POLICY

Students are expected to attend all scheduled School classes for the courses that they are registered for and  to  achieve  the  goals  set  forth  by  each  class  instructor.  Enrolled  students  are  permitted  no  more than 2 “free” absences in one semester. Students missing 3-­‐5 classes over the course of the semester will receive a one-­‐letter grade deduction from their final course grade; missing more than 6 classes will result in failure of the course regardless of grade average. lt is the student’s responsibility to arrange to make up work missed because of an absence.

As our courses are heavily taught practical subjects missing class can have consequences on student learning and eventually assessment and progression. A register will be taken in each class session. This data will be considered when for monitoring student engagement.

Students are responsible for informing the School of any unforeseen circumstances preventing their attendance of a scheduled class by emailing: miami@Istitutomarangoni.com

Students can be administratively withdrawn from the school based on poor engagement and/or if s/he withdraw herself/himself.

In case of students requiring a visa to study, the School is legally bound to notify the Authorities in the case of a poor attendance.

For more information, please contact Admissions Office.

ATTENDANCE EXCEPTIONAL FACTORS

By Exceptional Factors* it is meant serious illness or other exceptional and unpredictable cause of absence that may generate a negative effect on the student’s academic performance  concerning his/her attendance or evaluation.

Everyday life presents difficulties and issues that cause minor seasonal illnesses with which the student has to cope during his/her studies as they can also occur in the workplace or at home. It is advisable that the student takes appropriate measures in order to alleviate the effects of such minor seasonal illnesses, since such events will not be accepted as valid Exceptional Factors.

If students do not consider themselves capable of judging if the events that occurred may be accepted as valid Exceptional Factors, they may consult the Director of Education.

Exceptional Factors are (for example)*:

  • Serious illness/ injury/hospitalization
  • Bereavement (Close relative)
  • Victim of a Crime
  • Court Attendance

Exceptional Factors are not (for example)*:

  • Time management
  • problems (missing deadline, oversleeping)
  • Non-­‐availability of books or other resources
  • Loss of coursework
  • Financial problems
  • Moving house, family celebrations, medical appointments, holidays or other events that the student can plan in advance
  • Postal problems
  • Work Commitments
  • Misinterpretation of the exam timetable
  • Colds, headaches and other minor conditions
  • Daily transportation problems

STUDENT TARDINESS POLICY

A student is considered tardy if the student comes to class 5 minutes late. A student can be tardy up to 15 minutes after class has started. After 15 minutes the student will be considered absent. A student is considered to have left the class early if the student leaves before the end of class time. With three tardies or having left the class early three times, the student accumulates one full absence. If the student leaves early and misses half of the class period, it is considered a full absence. When a student has more than 6 tardies or has left class early 6 times, the instructor will contact the Director of Education to request an intervention session with the student. The goal of the intervention session is to develop and implement an intervention program to help students learn new ways to manage time.

Lateness for classes, tutorials, workshops, exam sessions, handins and any other appointments deemed necessary by the school will be viewed as “unprofessional behavior”. In contemporary teaching methods the first few minutes of a lesson is often given to the outlining of the sessions’ tasks or lesson plan of the class, therefore it is essential that all students arrive in a timely manner. Frequent poor time management may be considered academic misconduct. Time management is a skill that  is required by all areas of the fashion industry. As it is one of our aims to produce industry professionals at the highest level we require a demonstration of this essential skill.

SYSTEM OF EVALUATION

For every course offered at Istituto Marangoni Miami, the professor is to provide to the students at the beginning of the course a course syllabus that contains the following written information: (i) the method of evaluation and (ii) course requirements and value towards the final grade.

TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS

Students seeking to transfer credits earned at another postsecondary institution to Istituto Marangoni Miami  or  from  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami   to  other  institutions  should  note  that  the  transferability  of credits  is  at  the  discretion  of  the  accepting  institution.  It  is  the  student’s  responsibility  to  confirm whether or not another institution of the student’s choice will accept credits. The policy of the School regarding the evaluation of course content from other universities to determine its equivalency with a course offered at Istituto Marangoni Miami is that approximately three-­‐fourths   of the course content must  match  the  content  of  the  course  offered  at  Istituto  Marangoni  Miami  if  it  is  to  be  accepted  for transfer. No more than 75% of courses can be transfer credits for a degree to be awarded from Istituto Marangoni Miami.

For  evaluation  purposes,  students  must  provide  a  copy  of  the  course  description  for  the  course  to  be evaluated  and  the  school  catalog  for  the  time  period  during  which  the  course  was  taken.  Evaluations are  handled  on  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  basis. Courses must have  been  taken  witin  the  last ten  years.  Students who request an evaluation to transfer credits from  universities or colleges must pay a fee of $350 for the evaluation of the course, before any evaluation of transfer credits can take place.

Students are encouraged to submit official transcripts as soon as possible. Istituto Marangoni Miami recognizes credits from accredited higher education degree granting institutions, and relevant study undertaken at Istituto Marangoni’s network of schools and traning centres, and will not transfer credits for courses below college level. Evaluation of transferability of credits is performed by the Admissions Office. On occasion, the Admissions Office may seek the advice of the Director of Education, Program leader or faculty member in a specific discipline to perform course evaluations.

A grade of C or higher is required to receive transfer credit. However, grades for classes that were transferred from another school are shown as “T” on the transcript and will not be used in computing the student’s grade point average.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP)

DEFINITION OF SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS DEFINITION

Definition of Satisfactory Academic Progress:

Each student enrolled must demonstrate that he or she is making satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of his or her chosen program of study. The criteria that each student must meet to qualify as making “Satisfactory Academic Progress” are defined below. A student who is failing to meet this criterion at any point outlined below will not meet the standard of “Satisfactory Academic Progress”. Any of three remedies may be applied if a student is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress. These are as follows: academic probation, restricted class load status and/or termination from the program of study.

The definition of Satisfactory Academic Progress has both qualitative and quantitative criteria that must be met. The student must meet both of these sets of criteria to make Satisfactory Academic Progress. Unmet satisfactory academic progress also affects scholarship eligibility.

QUALITATIVE CRITERIA FOR SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Under the qualitative criteria, to make Satisfactory Academic Progress, the student must comply with the following two criteria:

  1. Demonstrate a minimum overall cumulative grade point average of 2.0 at the end of the student’s second term of enrollment, and at the end of each subsequent term
  2. Demonstrate successful completion of the required percentage of the total cumulative Clock Hours he or she has attempted in the program of

To maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress, a student must establish and maintain at least a 2.0 overall cumulative grade point average by the end of the student’s second term of enrollment and all subsequent terms of enrollment. Also, to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress, the student must complete the required percentage of coursework attempted.

Any student who fails to establish or maintain Satisfactory Academic Process must meet with the Director of Education.

A student who fails to establish or maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress will be placed on academic probation and maintain this status of academic probation during the following semester. At the end of the semester in which the student is on probation, the student’s overall GPA and Clock Hours Completion Percentage will be recalculated. A student will be removed from academic probation only if the student completes the appropriate percentage of coursework and earns a “C” or better in all courses attempted during the semester in which he or she is on academic probation and earns a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher.

Minimum Overall Cumulative GPA: Required percentage of completion of coursework attempted:
Interval I: End of the second term: 2.0/3.0 70%
Interval II: End of the student’s third and any subsequent term: 2.0/3.0 70%
Interval III: The total maximum for completion as timeframe described under “Quantitative Criteria” below. 2.0/3.0 70%

 

CALCULATION OF THE CLOCK HOUR COMPLETION PERCENTAGE

The Clock Hours completion ratio or percentage is calculated by dividing the total number Clock Hours successfully completed by the student in his or her program by the total number of Clock Hours attempted by the student. For the purposes of calculation, Clock Hours attempted by the student include:

  1. all courses taken while the student is enrolled in his or her program of study or
  2. a different program of study, if:
  • The subject matter of a course or courses in that different program of study is substantially the same as a course in his or her current program of study, or
  • If a course or courses count toward the satisfaction of any of the coursework requirement in the current program

CONDITIONS THAT MAY RESULT IN PROBATION, RESTRICTED COURSE LOAD STATUS OR TERMINATION

The following describes the conditions under which a student may be placed on probation, restricted course load or terminated completely from a program of study.

  1. Termination automatically applies to any student not making Satisfactory Academic Progress at the end of the semester, unless the student appeals the determination of the lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress in writing to the Director of The Director of Education may grant the student’s appeal if all the requirements specified below under Academic Probation and Restricted Course Load sections are met. If the appeal is granted, the student will be placed on probation or restricted course load status during the student’s next semester of attendance. Such action is not automatic, but at the discretion of the Institution.
  2. Termination automatically applies to any student not making Satisfactory Academic Progress at the end of the following, unless the student appeals the determination of the lack of Satisfactory Academic Progress in writing to the Director of The Director of Education may grant the student’s appeal if all the requirements specified below under Restricted Course Load sections are met. If the appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Restricted Course Load status during the student’s next semester of attendance.
  3. At the end of following semester, if the student is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress, he or she will be terminated from his or her program of study.

CALCULATION OF OVERALL CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT AVERAGE

The calculation of a student’s overall GPA in his or her program of study will include the following:

  • The grade or grades earned by the student during each course in which he or she was enrolled in the program of study at the
  • The grade or grades earned by the student during which he or she was enrolled in a different program of study at the
  • If the course or the content matter of any course taken in another program of study is substantially the same as a course in the student’s current program of study, that course satisfies the coursework requirement of his or her current program of

QUANTITATIVE CRITERIA FOR SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

All student must maintain a satisfactory overall GPA and successfully complete a minimum percentage of coursework (66.7% of hours attempted) each academic year. Additionally, a student must complete the program within a maximum timeframe of attempted Clock Hours.

The Maximum Time Frame for the Completion of any program of study is 150% of the Clock Hours designated for the program. A student is not be making Satisfactory Academic Progress if the school determines that the student is unable to obtain a diploma from his or her program without exceeding the Maximum Time Frame for Completion. In such case, the student will be terminated from his or her program of study.

The calculation of the Maximum Time Frame for Completion includes all courses taken while the student is enrolled in his or her program of study or a different program of study, if the subject matter of a course or courses in that different program of study is substantially the same as a course in his or her current program of study, or if a course or courses count toward the satisfaction of any of the coursework requirement in the current program. Authorized leave of absence periods will not be counted toward maximum time frame calculation.

MAXIMUM TIME FRAME FOR SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

Program Program Credits / Hours Maximum Time Frame Per Program (MTF)
Bachelor of Arts Fashion Design 120 Credits 180 Credits
Bachelor of Arts Fashion Business 120 Credits 180 Credits

 

Bachelors of Arts Fashion Styling 120 Credits 180 Credits
Associates of Art Fashion Studies 60 Credits 90 Credits
Fashion & Luxury Brand Management 36 Credits 58 Credits

 

ACADEMIC PROBATION

All students enrolled must demonstrate that he or she is making satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of his or her chosen program of study. The criteria that each student must meet to qualify as making “Satisfactory Academic Progress” are defined below. A student who is failing to meet this criterion at any point outlined below will not meet the standard of “Satisfactory Academic Progress”. Any of three remedies may be applied if a student is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress. These are as follows: academic probation, restricted class load status and/or termination from the program of study. The definition of Satisfactory Academic Progress has both qualitative and quantitative criteria that must be met. The student must meet both of these sets of criteria to make Satisfactory Academic Progress. Unmet satisfactory academic progress also affects scholarship eligibility.

RESTRICTED COUSE LOAD

Student who, during the semester of probation, still does not earn a C in every course or a 2.0 cumulative GPA  is  required  to  meet  with  his  or  her  coordinator  to  determine  whether  a  reduced  course  load  may  be appropriate for the student. If the coordinator determines that a reduced course load may be favorable for the  student,  then  the  student  may  register  the  next  semester  for  only  half  of  the  number  of  Clock  Hours normally taken by a full-­‐time student. If, during the semester in which the student is on Restricted Course Load, the student still does not earn at least a “C” or better in all courses and earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0, then the following semester, the student must register only for those courses in which he or she did not receive a “C” or better. If, during that semester, the student still does not earn a “C” or better for those courses, he or she will be terminated from the program of study and suspended from the Institution for  unsatisfactory  academic  performance.  A  suspended  student  is  eligible  to  apply  for  readmission  after  a minimum  of  one  semester,  and,  if  permitted  to  return,  will  be  on  academic  probation  and/  or  restricted course load status.

A student who, during the semester of probation, still does not earn a B-­‐ in every course or a 3.0 cumulative GPA  is  required  to  meet  with  his  or  her  coordinator  to  determine  whether  a  reduced  course  load  may  be appropriate for the student. If the coordinator determines that a reduced course load may be favorable for the  student,  then  the  student  may  register  the  next  semester  for  only  half  of  the  number  of  Clock  Hours normally taken by a full-­‐time student. If, during the semester in which the student is on Restricted Course Load, the student still does not earn at least a “B-­‐” or better in all courses and earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, then the following semester, the student must register only for those courses in which he or she did not receive a “B-­‐” or better. If, during that semester, the student still does not earn a “B-­‐” or better for  those  courses,  he  or  she  will  be  terminated  from  the  program  of  study  and  suspended  from  the Institution   for   unsatisfactory   academic   performance.   A   suspended   student   is   eligible   to   apply   for readmission  after  a  minimum  of  one  semester, and,  if  permitted  to  return,  will  be  on  academic  probation and/ or restricted course load status.

INCOMPLETE GRADE IN A COURSE

If a student receives a grade of A, B, C in any course, the student will have successfully completed that course. If the student receives a grade of “I”, he or she must successfully complete the required work for that course within a specified time arranged by the instructor and communicated to the student, but no later than the end of the semester following the semester in which the “I” was received. It is the student’s responsibility to follow up with the instructor to complete the course work. If the course work is not completed by the arranged time, the “I” becomes an “F”.

REPEAT COURSES

A student may repeat a course to improve the overall cumulative grade point average. If a student has an “F” and repeats the course and receives a better grade, for example, an “A”, then only the “A” is counted in  the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Clock Hours attempted and earned for the second attempt are counted in lieu of those earned for the initial attempt.

Though both attempts remain part of the student’s permanent record, the cumulative grade point average will reflect only the grade earned on the second attempt.

A student who earns grade of “F” in any course included in his or her program of study must repeat that course and complete it successfully before taking any course with respect to which the failed course is a prerequisite and before graduation.

A student who has successfully completed a course, but wishes to improve the grade received in the course, may also repeat the course. If the course is repeated, the grade earned for the last time the course is taken replaces the previous grade when the overall GPA is calculated. All grades for all courses attempted will remain on the student’s transcript, however.

CHANGE OF PROGRAM

Students who contemplate a change from one program to another should discuss this possibility with the Director of Education to determine the effect such a change would make on the student’s satisfactory academic progress. This institution defines satisfactory academic progress as completion of the total program in no more than 1.5 times the number of semesters described in this catalog for the program. All Clock Hours attempted count toward the total program length of 1.5 times the number of semesters required for completion of the program. If a student changes his/her program only the Clock Hours that are common to both programs may be accepted toward the new program.

ADDITIONAL PROGRAM

Students  who  wish  to  enroll  in  an  additional  program  must  re-­‐apply  for  admission.  Upon  acceptance, courses which count toward the new program completion requirements will be transferred. A student may only  transfer  courses  with  a  final  grade  of  “C”  or  higher. Clock  Hours  attempted  and  grades  earned  in  the student’s new program of study will count towards determining satisfactory academic progress.

WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

Students may withdraw from a course during the drop/add period. If the student withdraws a course during the drop/add period, they will receive a “W” grade in the course. The last day of physical attendance determines whether or not grades are recorded for the semester. If the last day of attendance is within the first half of the semester, a grade of “W” is given. If the last day of attendance is within the second half of the semester, the student will receive a final letter grade. The grade of “W” has no effect on the student’s cumulative GPA. However, the grade of “W” is added to hours attempted within the specified maximum time frame.

*Financial Obligations for withdrawing from a course will be as stated in the Refund Policy.

READMISSION AFTER SUSPENSION FOR UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS

If the student was not making satisfactory academic progress in his or her program of study as of the last semester enrolled, the student will not be readmitted into the same or a different program, unless the student makes an appeal in writing concerning the institution’s determination to the Director of Education (as provided below in the Appeal section) and the Director of Education grants the student’s appeal. The Director of Education will consider mitigating circumstances in addressing the appeal. If the Director of Education grants the appeal, then the student will be placed on either academic probation or restricted course load status (at the Director of Education discretion, as appropriate) during the student’s next semester of attendance in any program of study.

If the student is given permission for readmission, the student must agree in writing to the terms for readmission outlined by the institution and must execute a new Enrollment Agreement. The student must also pay all current tuition, fees and any other costs associated with the student’s program of study.

APPEALING A DETERMINATION OF UNSATISFACTORY PROGRESS

If it is determines that a student is failing to make satisfactory academic progress in his or her program of study, the student may appeal the determination in writing to the Director of Education. The student’s appeal must provide details concerning the circumstances affecting the student’s academic progress (such as serious illness or injury befalling the student, the death of a close relative of the student or any other special circumstances) that may influence the institution’s decision to terminate or not to readmit the student into his or her program of study.

The Director of Education will consider the appeal to determine whether the special  circumstances explained in the student’s written appeal are mitigating circumstances that will allow the student to remain enrolled in or readmitted to his or her program of study despite the student’s failure to conform to the requirements of Satisfactory Academic Progress. The determination of the student’s appeal will be made by the discretion of the Director of Education in conformity to the principles and standards described in this catalog and will be final and binding on the student. If the Director of Education decides in favor of the student’s appeal, the student will be placed either on academic probation or restricted course load status during the student’s next semester of attendance in a program of study.

PROCEDURE FOR GRADE APPEALS

There  is  a  committee,  the  purpose  of  which  is  to  address  requests  for  revision  of  academic  grade(s).  This Committee,  known  as  the  “Grades  Committee,”  consists  of  the  Director  and  two  instructors.  The  Grades Committee  members  are  proposed  every  semester  by  the  Director  and  approved  by  the  President.  The Committee establishes its internal decision-­‐making procedure that will be made public.

The instructor responsible for the course is the only person who may make a grade change and he or she must notify the Registration Department when and if the change is made. When a student appeals a grade, the student will provide the faculty member with a copy of all petitions. A challenge to a grade received in a course, comprehensive examination, or other graduation requirement will be considered only when the student alleges that the grade received reflects other than appropriate academic criteria, that is, achievement and proficiency in the subject matter as stated in the course syllabus.

A student who deems it appropriate to challenge a grade will proceed as follows:

If the grade challenged is in a course, the student will first discuss the matter with the instructor teaching the course in an effort to resolve the grievance informally.

If the grievance is not settled, the student may then file the Grade Appeal Form with the Director.

The form must be filed no later than ninety (90) calendar days after the date on which the grade was due in the Registrar’s Office.

The Director will make an informal investigation, hearing both the student and the instructor, and attempt an informal reconciliation.

The Director will render a decision within thirty (30) calendar days and inform the student and instructor in writing.

If the student wishes to appeal the decision of the Director, he or she may request that the Grades Committee investigate the decision.

The Grades Committee will make a formal investigation, hearing both the student and instructor.

The Committee will reach a decision within thirty (30) calendar days and notify the student, the instructor, and the Director in writing.

The decision will be either that the grade will stand, or that the faculty member will change the grade as recommended by the Grades Committee.

The student and/or the faculty member may appeal the decision of the Grades Committee to the Director no later than five (5) working days after the Committee’s decision.

The Director decision shall be final.

GRADING SCALE

The grading scale for academic performance appears below. Unless otherwise indicated, each grade earned is calculated into the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the credits assigned for the course taken are included in the calculation of total clock hours attempted.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

Each letter grade has a point value. To compute the grade point value for a course, multiply the grade point value by the number of clock hours. For example, a “B” in a 24-­‐hour course is equal to 72 points (clock hours).  To calculate a GPA, add the total grade point values for all courses and divide that figure by the total number of credit hours attempted.

GRADING SYSTEM

The grading system for academic performance appears on the following page. Unless otherwise indicated, each grade earned is calculated into the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the credits assigned for the course taken are included in the calculation of total clock hours attempted.

* The highest letter Grade a student may receive is an A.

Letter Grade Numerical Value GPA
A 94-­‐100% 4.00
A-­‐ 90-­‐93% 3.70
B+ 87-­‐89% 3.33
B 83-­‐86% 3.00
B-­‐ 80-­‐82% 2.70
C+ 77-­‐79% 2.30
C 73-­‐76% 2.00
C-­‐ 70-­‐72% 1.70
D+ 67-­‐69% 1.30
D 60-­‐66% 1.00
F 0-­‐59% 0.00
I -­‐ -­‐ Incomplete*
TR -­‐ -­‐ Transfer Credit*
W -­‐ -­‐ Withdrawal**

* Grade not calculated into cumulative grade point average (CGPA) but course hours are included in total credits attempted.

** Grade not calculated in CGPA and course hours are not included in total credits attempted.

Repeated Courses

The new grade for a failed course that has been repeated will not replace the prior grade. Both the grade earned and the credits taken for the repeated course will be included in the SAP calculations.

Incompletes (Grades of I)

At the discretion of the instructor, a student may be assigned a temporary grade of incomplete (I) to allow the student more time to complete missing coursework or to take a required exam. Upon completion of the work or exam, the earned grade replaces the grade of “I” and is calculated into the grade average for the level and for the CGPA. If the missing work or exam is not completed within two weeks from the last day of the course, a grade of “F” will be assigned and computed into the final grade average for the course and into the CGPA.

TR Grade

A grade of TR is assigned for a student’s successful transfer of credits earned from an accredited institution. Neither the grade nor the credits are included in the CGPA or credits attempted calculations. The total number of credits transferred is deducted from the total number of credits needed for program completion. The maximum time frame (MTF) for a transfer student will be 1.5 times the total hours needed for program completion.

W Grade

A student who formally withdraws from the institution before the mid-­‐point (50% or half-­‐way point) of a course will be assigned a grade of W for the course. The W grade is not included in the calculation of the  CGPA  and  the  credits  for  the  course  are  not  included  in  the  determination  of  total  credits attempted.

WP Grade

A  student  who  formally  withdraws  from  the  institution  after  the  mid-­‐point  of  a  course  and  who  had earned an overall score of 2.5 or higher by the time of the withdrawal will be assigned a grade of WP for  the  course.  The  WP  grade  is  not  included  in  the  calculation  of  the  CGPA  and  the  credits  for  the course are not included in the determination of total credits attempted.

WF Grade

A student who formally withdraws from the institution or who stops attending after the mid-­‐point of a course and who has earned less than an overall score of 2.5 or higher by the time of the withdrawal will be assigned a grade of WF for the course. The WF grade is included in the calculation of the CGPA and the credits for the course are included in the determination of total credits attempted.

GRADUATION POLICY

Undergraduate students who have maintained at least a 2.0 GPA and have completed all the required coursework for their major and have satisfied all of their financial obligations are eligible for graduation.

Application for graduation must be made to the Admissions office by the end of the fifth week of classes in the student’s final term. The Student Services Office will provide students with a diploma upon satisfactory completion of all remaining coursework. Students who have applied for graduation but do not meet the minimum requirements will receive a letter within five (5) working days after the Application for Graduation was received. This letter will provide the student with specific information about their progress to date, and any remaining requirements that must be met.

FINAL SHOW REGULATIONS AND SELECTION

Selection of students to participate in any final fashion show or degree show is limited and cannot be guranteed (menswear / womenswear fashion and accessories collections).

A committee made up of the School Director, Director of Education, Program Leader, 1 faculty member and up to 2 external advisers will make the selections during the final term.

STUDENT RECORDS

Students should be aware that student records submitted to the School become the property of the School and shall not be released to third parties. The school reserves the right to use the records, as it deems appropriate. A hold shall be placed on the records of any student that owes an obligation to the School. A student may not register or receive a transcript from the School until the obligation is paid in full to the School and the hold is properly removed. Removal of a hold may take approximately two (2) business days.

TRANSCRIPT REQUESTS

Provided  a  hold  does  not  exist,  a  student  may  request  a  transcript  from  the  admission  office  by completing  and  delivering  a  transcript  request  form.  The  School  will  release  the  transcript  to  the student.  Transcript  requests  may  be  made  in  person  or  by  mail.  The  School  will  charge  $25.00  for official transcripts, and $5.00 per non-­‐official transcript. Official and non-­‐official transcript request may take approximately five (5) to ten (10) business days to process.

STUDENTS’ RIGHT TO KNOW

The School has policies that ensure that students have access to records as provided under federal and state law. Istituto Marangoni Miami is in compliance with Student Right to Know Act (PL 101-­‐542). The following policies   describe  student  rights  in  this  regard.  Please  contact  the  Student  Services  Office  for  further questions regarding a student’s rights to access his/her records.

AMENDMENT OF RECORDS

A student who believes that information contained in his or her records is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the privacy or other rights of the student, may request that the Istituto Marangoni Miami official who maintains the records amend them. The official who maintains the records has a responsibility to consult with appropriate officials of the School for further determination or confirmation. If the School decides to refuse to amend the education  records  of the  student  in accordance  with  the request,  it will so inform the student of the refusal, and advise the student of the right to ahearing.

HEARING PROCEDURES

Should the request for a change in the student’s records be denied, the student may appeal the decision to the School Director within thirty (30) days and ask for a hearing. School Director shall designate a hearing committee, which will include one administrator other than the one who has denied the request, the Director of Education and two faculty members of Istituto Marangoni Miami.

The decision of the Hearing Committee shall be final, except that final appeal to the School Director of the School remains open. The challenge to be considered in such hearings may extend only to the material in the respective School file, e.g., it may extend to the correct recording of a grade, but not to the appropriateness of the grade.

Students, dissatisfied with the results of a hearing may place a statement in the education record in question commenting upon the information therein, and/or setting forth any reason for disagreement with the School’s decision not to correct or amend the record. Such a statement shall become a part of the information contained in the education record and will be disclosed with it.

MAINTENANCE OF STUDENT RECORDS

Official academic records are maintained in the Registration Department. Included are admission applications and associated documentation, the registration forms for each semester in residence; the records of grades and credits received in courses at this institution or accepted here from other institutions; and other documents directly relating to the student’s academic progress and status.

Student records are kept in its original copy for 5 years. After that period only electronic copy will be stored.

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

The course numbering system uses alphanumeric identifiers. The letters represent the type of course and the numbers represent the sequence or order of the courses that will be taught.

Fashion Studies AA Fashion Design BA Fashion Styling BA Fashion Business BA Fashion & Luxury Brand Managment MA
ARH100 ARH100 ADV400 ARH100 LBM511
BSC105 BSC105 ARH100 BSC105 LBM512
BUS200 BUS200 BSC105 BUS200 LBM513
COM100 BUS305 BUS200 BUS300 LBM514
COM200 COM100 COM100 BUS305 LBM515
DRA100 COM200 COM200 BUS310 LBM516
DRA200 COM300 COM310 BUS315 LBM517
ECO200 COM305 COM315 BUS320 LBM518
ENC101 COM400 COM410 BUS325 LBM519
ENC202 DRA100 COM415 BUS400 LBM521
ENV209 DRA200 COM420 BUS405 LBM522
FAS100 DRA300 DRA100 BUS410 LBM523
HIS100 DRA305 DRA200 BUS415 LBM524
MAC105 DRA400 ECO200 BUS420 LBM525
MAC114 ECO200 ENC101 BUS425 LBM601
PSY201 ENC101 ENC202 COM100
SOC200 ENC202 ENV209 COM200

 

SPC201 ENV209 FAS100 COM430
TEX200 FAS100 FAS300 DRA100
WHO100 HIS100 FAS305 DRA200
HIS300 FAS400 ECO200
MAC105 HIS100 ENC101
MAC114 HIS300 ENC202
PAT300 HIS400 ENV209
PAT305 MAC105 FAS100
PAT400 MAC114 HIS100
PAT405 PHI300 HIS300
PAT410 PHI305 MAC105
PHI300 PHO300 MAC114
PHI305 PHO305 PHI300
PRO400 PSY201 PHI305
PRO405 RES410 PRO420
PSY201 SOC200 PSY201
RES300 SPC201 SOC200
RES400 STA300 SPC201
SOC200 TEX200 STA300
SPC201 TRE300 TEX200
STA300 VME400 TRE300
TEX200 WHO100 VME400
WHO100 WRI400 WHO100

 

CREDIT HOURS

Istituto Marangoni Miami a awards credit in the form of, a credit hour, as defined as an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than (1) One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each class for approximately the duration of the module for credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or (2) At least an equivalent amount of work as required by academic standards to meet compliance of other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practical, studio work, presentations, research, and other academic work leading to the  award of credit hour completion.

  • One credit hour equals, 15 classroom hours of lecture, 30 hours of laboratory, and 45 hours of The formula for calculating the number of semester credit hours for each course is: (hours of lecture/15) + (hours of lab/30) + (hours of practicum/45).

 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

FASHION STUDIES (ASSOCIATE OF ARTS)

PROGRAM DATA
Program Title: Fashion Studies
Credential Issued: Associate of Arts
Program Delivery: On Campus
Program Length Credit Hours: 60

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • High school diploma, GED, or proof secondary education
  • Completed enrollment agreement,
  • $100 nonrefundable application fee,
  • Updated resume/cv,
  • Personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The Associate of Arts (AA) program in Fashion Studies aims to provide a solid base in three key disciplines of the fashion industry: Fashion Design, Fashion Business and Fashion Styling.

Alongside general education requirements the program provides an introduction into all three areas giving students the chance to engage in the fashion industry from both a creative and business perspective. This unique program forms multidisciplinary profiles capable of pursuing and developing careers in the areas of design, management, marketing and communication, and styling, meeting a growing demand for creative and business skills in the  fashion industry -­‐ the mastermind that is both designer and manager.

Over the course of two years students are presented with exciting new challenges that will improve their critical independent thinking, develop their creative and business skills, and help them identify exactly where their true passion lies.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Fashion Studies: Fashion Design, Business & Style.

The program provides important skills in three main course disciplines of the fashion industry; Design, Business and Styling, as well as key notions in art history and research.

From basic drawing techniques in shape, light and shadow, students move on to study stylized fashion design and the human figure, as well as digital design techniques. The study of fabrics and materials takes an in-­‐depth look at fabric properties and how they are used in the industry. Cultural and historical analysis of art and dress further contextualizes and underpins the development of creative skills.

Students gain an understanding of the business of fashion, looking at marketing principles, practices and communication strategies. Managers with both design and management skills are rare. Today companies recognize and acknowledge the way designers ‘think’ as a strategic asset; an alternative to traditional management methods and approaches toward company growth.

Style and research, key to innovative design and creative ideas, is paramount throughout the program. Students are introduced to the role of the fashion stylist, and to visual representation as an ‘art’; presenting products or communicating a vision in order to attract and engage the fashion consumer. Through creative and visual research students discover the world of trends, and the role and influence of visual representation.

This stimulating course prepares students with the key skills for entry onto any of the BA Major programs in Fashion Design, Fashion Business, and Fashion Styling.

Areas of study include:

  • Digital Design (CAD)
  • Basic Drawing
  • Fashion Design & Illustration
  • Fabrics & Materials Analysis History of Dress & Costume Fashion Styling
  • Visual Research
  • Fashion Business and Marketing
PROGRAM BREAKDOWN BY COURSE
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ARH100 HISTORY OF ART* 3
BSC105 BIOLOGY* 3
BUS200 FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES 3
COM100 DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM200 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN 3
DRA100 DRAWING I 3
DRA200 FASHION DRAWING I 3
ECO200 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS* 3
ENC101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I* 3
ENC202 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II* 3
ENV209 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE* 3
FAS100 FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH 3
HIS100 HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME 3
MAC105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I* 3
MAC114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II* 3
PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* 3
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* 3
SPC201 SPEECH* 3
TEX200 FABRICS & MATERIALS 3
WHO100 WORLD HISTORY* 3
TOTAL 60

 

FASHION DESIGN (BACHELOR OF ART)

PROGRAM DATA
Program Title: Fashion Design
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Program Delivery: On Campus
Program Length Credit Hours: 120

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • High school diploma, GED, or evidence of secondary education,
  • Completed enrollment agreement,
  • $100 non-­‐refundable application fee,
  • Updated resume/cv,
  • Personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE:

The 4-­‐year Bachelor of Arts program in Fashion Design aims to form future professionals for the engaging fashion industry.

Today’s fashion designers are catalysts of creativity, forming new trends, responding to consumer demands, industry developments and new technology, from initial design right through to the finished garment.

Students learn a breadth of skills and knowledge in design, pattern cutting and garment technology, for womenswear, menswear, and elements of fashion accessories design. The program encourages students to develop an individual style, necessary to build a solid future in fashion.

They will be equipped to deal with existing and emerging technologies in today’s apparel manufacturing and retailing environments, and have an understanding of business practices within the global clothing industry. In the final year students work as independent practitioners, completing the course with the necessary skills to progress onto industry placement, postgraduate study, or as independent self-­‐employed professionals.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

This program trains skilled fashion designers capable of using techniques in clothing manufacture, as well as being able to respond to new demands in the fashion and luxury industry. The fashion designer is the source of creative ideas and new trends, not only in clothing, but also in textiles, fabrics and accessories.

Starting with skills in sketching and fashion drawing, this course moves on to address key notions and advanced techniques in fashion design and fabric and clothing manufacturing, as well as cultural studies in the history of dress, and the fashion system. Working directly from their own illustrated ideas students progress on to collection design and garment making; selecting the most appropriate materials, analysing fabrics, applying draping and pattern cutting techniques, and final garment construction.

Students learn how to create collections and work on an accurate analysis of materials and fabrics, integrating communication codes and influences that may come from personal experiences, art, cinema and design to name just a few. Research approaches to creative and original product development are key throughout.

Students are also encouraged to experiment with new approaches in the industry that are evolving today, including renewable and sustainable resources, innovative materials and new technologies, building an individual style and nurturing creative and professional abilities to design womenswear and menswear collections, with an eye constantly attuned to new style codes, key production methods are also covered.

They understand the fashion business and know how to calculate production costs to meet the needs of the target consumer and anticipate trends, while respecting the brand’s image or client brief.

The study of trends encourages students to create an innovative and contemporary individual collection. In the final year of the course, the best collections may be showcased.

 

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ARH100 HISTORY OF ART* 3
BSC105 BIOLOGY* 3
BUS200 FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3
BUS305 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 3
COM100 DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM200 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM300 DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION 3
COM305 PORTFOLIO AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION I 3
COM400 PORTFOLIO AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION II 3
DRA100 DRAWING I 3
DRA200 FASHION DRAWING I 3
DRA300 FASHION DRAWING II 3
DRA305 FASHION DRAWING III 3
DRA400 FASHION COLLECTION 3
ECO200 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS* 3
ENC101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I* 3
ENC202 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II* 3
ENV209 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE* 3
FAS100 FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH 3
HIS100 HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME 3
HIS300 FASHION HISTORY & CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE 3
MAC105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I* 3
MAC114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II* 3

 

PAT300 PATTERN CUTTING I 3
PAT305 PATTERN CUTTING II 3
PAT400 ATELIER I 3
PAT405 EXPERIMENTAL CUTTING 3
PAT410 ATELIER II 3
PHI300 ETHICS* 3
PHI305 CRITICAL THINKING* 3
PRO400 INDUSTRY PROJECT 3
PRO405 FINAL COLLECTION -­‐ THESIS 3
PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* 3
RES300 RESEARCH AND DESIGN 3
RES400 CREATIVE RESEARCH 3
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* 3
SPC201 SPEECH* 3
STA300 STATISTICS* 3
TEX200 FABRICS & MATERIALS 3
WHO100 WORLD HISTORY* 3
TOTAL 120

FASHION STYLING (BACHELOR OF ART) 

PROGRAM DATA
Program Title: Fashion Styling
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Program Delivery: On Campus
Program Length Credit Hours: 120

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • High school diploma, GED, or evidence of secondary education
  • Completed enrollment agreement,
  • $100 non-­‐refundable application fee,
  • Updated resume/cv,
  • Personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE

The  4-­‐year  Bachelor  of  Art  program  in  Fashion  Styling  forms  future  professionals  and  ‘creatives’  with  the ability  to  work  within  the  fashion  system  in  areas  of  visual  communication  such  as  publishing,  advertising, visual merchandising, trend or style forecasting and blogging.

The fashion stylist is an expert in fashion communication and must be able to define and produce a winning combination  of  component  parts  in  order  to  create  an  image  or  ‘look’  to  emphasize  the  style  of  a  brand,  a magazine or a person.

This can be achieved through the careful use of clothes, accessories, hair and make-­‐up, through atmosphere and  location  and  through  the  knowledge  and  analysis  of  contemporary  and  future  trends.  The  skills  lie  in interpreting the soul of an article of clothing, or product, and communicating it through a unique style.

The  Fashion  Styling  program  aims  to  provide  students  with  creative,  transferable  skills  and  subject  specific expertise  in  trend  forecasting,  analysis  and  interpretation  of  style  and  brands,  visual  communication  and merchandising:  they  will  learn  to  apply  these  skills  to  the  present  and  emerging  technologies  in  today’s fashion communication industry, while also gain an understanding of operations and business practices within the global fashion, luxury and design industry.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Presenting  contemporary  and  future  trends,  enhancing  the  collections  of  designers,  informing  and  inspiring their readers: this is the exciting mission of the fashion stylist. By the end of the program students will gain the ability to recognize different styles and trends, clearly define their personal vision of a product, and propose innovative and professional ideas successfully.

By understanding the role and responsibilities of the professional stylist students learn how to pull together, organize  and  lead  a  team  of experts  to  ensure  the  direction  of what  goes  in  the  fashion  magazines, appears online,  or  on  the  catwalk,  communicates  the  right  messages,  at  the  right  time,  and  to  the  right  target audience.

From  a  solid  base  in  styling,  this  course  moves  onto  explore  multiple  areas  of  the  fashion  industry  where management of the creative process is core practice. Students are encouraged to develop their own ideas and experiment in producing a different variety of visual outcomes, such as fashion editorials, viral videos, brand image and restyling proposals, interactive and print advertising campaigns, and social media visual contents. The course covers key skills in fashion copywriting, PR and media planning, fashion production management, business planning, time management, and advertising deadlines and budgets. Cultural studies in the history of design,  dress  and  fashion  culture  provide  the  necessary  skills  to  make  a  critical  assessment  of  a  brand  or client’s lifestyle and legacy.

Students  are  encouraged  to  decode  stereotypes  and  to  think  about  image  positioning  from  a  different perspective  in  order  to  discover  their  own  unique  personal  style.  The  ultimate  goal  is  the  independent creation of a professional styling portfolio that fully expresses the personality and skills of the student.

 

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ADV400 ADVERTISING IN STYLING 3
ARH100 HISTORY OF ART* 3
BSC105 BIOLOGY* 3
BUS200 FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3
COM100 DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM200 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM310 GRAPHIC DESIGN I 3
COM315 GRAPHIC DESIGN II 3
COM410 GRAPHIC DESIGN III 3
COM415 DIGITAL PORTFOLIO 3
COM420 MULTIMEDIA 3
DRA100 DRAWING I 3
DRA200 FASHION DRAWING I 3
ECO200 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS* 3
ENC101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I* 3
ENC202 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II* 3
ENV209 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE* 3
FAS100 FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH 3
FAS300 FASHION STYLING I 3
FAS305 FASHION STYLING II 3
FAS400 FASHION STYLING AND EDITORIAL 3
HIS100 HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME 3
HIS300 FASHION HISTORY AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE 3
HIS400 PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE ANALYSIS 3
MAC105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I* 3
MAC114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II* 3
PHI300 ETHICS* 3
PHI305 CRITICAL THINKING* 3
PHO300 PHOTOGRAPHY I 3
PHO305 PHOTOGRAPHY II 3

 

PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* 3
RES410 TREND RESEARCH AND CREATIVE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT 3
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* 3
SPC201 SPEECH* 3
STA300 STATISTICS* 3
TEX200 FABRICS AND MATERIALS 3
TRE300 TREND FORECASTING 3
VME400 VISUAL MERCHANDISING 3
WHO100 WORLD HISTORY* 3
WRI400 ADVANCED FASHION WRITING -­‐  THESIS 3
TOTAL 120

 

FASHION BUSINESS (BACHELOR OF ART) 

PROGRAM DATA
Program Title: Fashion Business
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Program Delivery: On Campus
Program Length Credit Hours: 120

 

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • High school diploma, GED, or evidence of secondary education
  • Completed enrollment agreement,
  • $100 nonrefundable application fee,
  • Updated resume/cv,
  • Personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE:

The 4-­‐year Bachelor of Art program in Fashion Business aims to provide students with a thorough knowledge and  understanding  of  the  different  methods,  processes,  and  types  of  businesses  that  are  part  of  the  wider picture of the global fashion industry.

The  fashion  business  manager  studies  the  fashion  scene,  analyses  the  competition,  and  evaluates  product development, planning, promotion and sales channels, collaborating with all business areas including design, production, marketing and sales departments. Fashion business professionals are able to evaluate the intrinsic characteristics  of  the  garment  or  product,  the  evolution  of  consumer  habits,  lifestyles  and  the  needs  of  the market.  They  understand  techniques  of  sales  and  marketing,  the  target  audience  and  setting  a  price  range, and are skilled in coordinating business partners and employees.

The overall aim of the Fashion Business program is to provide students with an in depth understanding of the principles  of  business  practice,  management  and  marketing,  via  an  in  depth  exploration  of  how  these principles operate within the confines of fashion and luxury.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 This program addresses all issues related to the marketing and development strategies of a brand, identifying the values that characterize the fashion identity of a company (equity).

From  a strategic and market oriented blend of the main perspectives in fashion business, the course covers; business  strategy,  budgeting,  finance,  product  development,  fashion  marketing,  communication,  branding, retail  operations  management,  global  distribution  channels,  as  well  as  customer  relationship  management and   CSR.   Fashion   is   an   industry   in   constant   evolution;   therefore   both   time-­‐tested   and   contemporary marketing  strategies  are  analyzed  in  order  to  achieve  business  goals.  Students  learn  brand  marketing  and development  strategies,  identifying  the  values  that  characterize  the  identity  and  ‘signature’  of  a  product  or brand.  By  studying  cultural,  sociological  and  historical  dynamics  in  fashion,  they  understand  the  influence  of trends in different countries and realities and their impact on sales performance. The course looks at current issues in the industry including sustainability and new media digital marketing (virtual platforms, e-­‐commerce, social  media)  working  to  define  a  commercial  proposal  that  meets  the  demands  of  the  fashion  industry  of today.  Key  focus  is  also  given  to  competitor  evaluation  and  analysis  techniques.  Through  the  principles  of economics  and  finance,  students  are  able  to  measure  profitability  and  ensure  compliance  with  budgets  and strategies, and implement specific cost control systems.

At the end of the program, students undertake a research project resulting in a business plan for a start-­‐up, or for existing brand development. This course teaches real-­‐world business skills.

 

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ARH100 HISTORY OF ART* 3
BSC105 BIOLOGY* 3
BUS200 FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 3
BUS300 FASHION COMMUNICATION 3
BUS305 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 3
BUS310 MICROECONOMICS 3
BUS315 BRAND AND BRANDING STRATEGIES 3
BUS320 FASHION BUYING 3
BUS325 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 3
BUS400 MERCHANDISING 3
BUS405 FASHION RETAIL MANAGEMENT 3
BUS410 FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT CONTROL 3
BUS415 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN FASHION 3
BUS420 LUXURY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3
BUS425 MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP 3
COM100 DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM200 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN 3
COM430 DIGITAL MARKETING AND E-­‐COMMERCE 3
DRA100 DRAWING I 3
DRA200 FASHION DRAWING I 3
ECO200 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS* 3
ENC101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I* 3
ENC202 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II* 3
ENV209 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE* 3
FAS100 FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH 3
HIS100 HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME 3
HIS300 FASHION HISTORY & CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE 3
MAC105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I* 3
MAC114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II* 3
PHI300 ETHICS* 3
PHI305 CRITICAL THINKING* 3
PRO420 FASHION ENTREPRENEURSHIP -­‐  THESIS 3
PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* 3
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* 3
SPC201 SPEECH* 3
STA300 STATISTICS* 3
TEX200 FABRICS AND MATERIALS 3
TRE300 TREND FORECASTING 3
VME400 VISUAL MERCHANDISING 3
WHO100 WORLD HISTORY* 3
TOTAL 120

 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS ADMISSIONS

Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following: Submit evidence of a completed Bachelors Program,

Submit a completed enrollment agreement application form. Admissions application,

Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee, Submit an updated resume/cv,

Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals. Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

  • The selection process of the school will allow for admission of graduate students on the basis of the applicants’ academic credentials in addition to a review of all the information contained in the application, both academic and persona!. For that reason, applicants may also submit letters of recommendation in order to give the Institution a complete picture of the applicant, as a student and as a
  • Admissions requirements to specific graduate programs may vary -­‐ students should refer to the program descriptions found in the Catalog for additional

Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the institution. An applicant’s total undergraduate record including grades, educational objective and pattern of courses completed, as well as persona! and professional goals will be considered

GRADUATE TUITION, FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES

Program Credit Hours Total Per Credit Hour Total Cost Application Fee Graduation Fee Total Including Fees *
Master of Arts Fashion & Luxury Brand Management 36 $ 1100 $ 39,600 $ 100 $ 250 $39,950

 

GRADUATE PROGRAM

Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following:

  • Submit evidence of a completed Bachelors Program,
  • Submit a completed enrollment agreement application
  • Admissions application,
  • Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,
  • Submit an updated resume/cv,
  • Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

FASHION & LUXURY BRAND MANAGEMENT (MASTER OF ARTS)

PROGRAM DATA
Program Title: Fashion & Luxury Brand Management
Credential Issued: Master Of Arts
Program Delivery On Campus
Program Length Credit Hours: 36

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

Applicants will be considered for admission if they satisfy the following:

  • Submit evidence of a completed Bachelors Program,
  • Submit a completed enrollment agreement application form 2017-­‐
  • Admissions application,
  • Submit a $100 nonrefundable application fee,
  • Submit an updated resume/cv,
  • Submit a personal statement that describes the applicant’s professional accomplishments and goals.
  • Copy of valid government issued ID, for example passport

PROGRAM OBJECTIVE:

The Master of Arts (MA) program in Fashion & Luxury Brand Management aims to provide in-­‐depth knowledge of management and branding, specifically for the fashion and luxury goods industries.

This program is for participants that have previous undergraduate level study or proven work experience, completing the program with advanced branding and management skills for various positions within the fashion, luxury and creative industries.

Over the course of two years participants are taught how to motivate, create desire, and build consumer loyalty through various channels in merchandising, marketing and communication in order to meet the expectations of a luxury brand’s vision and strategy.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The task of the brand manager is not only to attract and retain consumers, but also to improve the practical and organisational management of a brand within the fashion organisation -­‐ this course addresses both areas; luxury branding together with business management and organisation skills.

Participants learn how to adapt communication, marketing and promotional techniques to reach goals and sales targets, and fully apply the key strategies of luxury businesses. As well as concentrating on the intangible elements: customer relationships, the impact of social media and the consumer ‘experience’, the course makes a critical analysis of the more tangible elements of branding; product attributes (quality, features, and design), and the difference between brand image and brand identity, packaging and labelling.

A successful brand manager works on all of these aspects. They become experts in making key branding decisions including brand extension and brand repositioning, and learn how to detect any weaker products in a collection. Analysis of the target audience and marketing mix provides a solid grounding for brand strategy development together with research on how companies in the fashion and luxury market develop their own interpretation of brand positioning and devise innovative strategies.

The impact of social media has changed the face of communication and this course looks at finding the right  balance between corporate brand image, enabling participants to network through new media and viral platforms – key to the success of luxury brands today. Along with the study of past styles and the analysis of current trends and forecasts related to “future-­‐fashion”, participants are able to question how aesthetic expressions and interpretations of social and cultural trends influence positioning and brand image.

This stimulating course prepares participants with specialised knowledge in Brand Management to support a future career in the fashion, luxury and creative industries.

At MA level, intensive coursework and home study may be assigned. Areas of study include:

  • Luxury brand analyses and marketing strategies
  • Strategic branding and innovation management
  • Media planning and digital communication
  • Product creativity and production
  • Contemporary issues in fashion
  • Performance management, growth and market entry
  • Commercialisation and retail in luxury
  • Research methodologies

 

PROGRAM BREAKDOWN BY COURSE
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
LBM511 FUTURE OF FASHION 2

 

LBM512 STRATEGIC MARKETING AND RETAIL ANALYSIS 3
LBM513 COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES 3
LBM514 RESEARCH METHODS 2
LBM515 DEVELOPING BRAND IDENTITIES 1
LBM516 ROLE OF DESIGN AND CREATIVITY 2
LBM517 FASHION PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 3
LBM518 COMMERCIALIZATION AND RETAIL 1
LBM519 BRANDS AND BRANDING STRATEGIES 3
LBM521 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS 1
LBM522 BUSINESS OF LUXURY 3
LBM523 MANAGING LUXURY 3
LBM524 CREATING, COMMUNICATING AND DELIVERING LUXURY 1
LBM525 FASHION ENTREPRENEURS 2
LBM601 CAPSTONE PROJECT 6
 TOTAL 36

 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM(S) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Program Title: Fashion Studies
Credential Issued: Associate Of Arts
Course Number Course Title Course Description
 

 

ARH100

 

 

HISTORY OF ART*

This course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of western art through an evolution of History of Art from ancient times to the end of Late Middle Ages in Europe. The analysis is set in an extended historical, social, political and cultural context. The relationship between art and society, in centuries, is also studied to elaborate comparisons between past history and the contemporary cultural world.
 

BSC105

 

BIOLOGY*

This  course  is  for  non-­‐science  majors  to  provide  students  with  the  basic  biology concepts; selected topics will include: cell concept, evolution, genetics and ecology. The students are expected to use the scientific method of thinking to analyze and make informed decisions about the environment.
 

 

BUS200

 

FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES

Through the recognition and understanding of the principles and practices of the main marketing tools, students develop a professional approach to the various marketing communications strategies that are applied in the fashion industry. The course takes a look at creative marketing in the contemporary fashion industry, considering traditional methods to online digital techniques in advertising and promotion.
 

 

COM100

 

 

DIGITAL DESIGN

This course teaches the basic notions of digital graphics for the field of Fashion Design. Through the study and the use of a variety of computer applications, students acquire the tools to work on photographic retouching and elaboration of images, with the purpose of presenting their creative ideas to a client or professional public. Students also learn how to use key software packages to create visual documents and presentations.
 

 

COM200

 

 

ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

This course helps students extend their knowledge of multimedia; web and digital design, analysing the basic components of digital design tools, among which vector graphics and animation. By combining an overall creative vision and web design techniques, students will be able to produce a final project consisting in the creation of their own home page.

Prerequisite COM100

 

DRA100

 

DRAWING I

In this course students learn basic drawing techniques by working on direct observation, and using nature, objects and architecture as a source of study. Basic elements include: the representation of shape, light and shadow, and the study of space, depth and proportions. In order to develop new ideas, both traditional research tools and digital resources are used.
 

 

DRA200

 

 

FASHION DRAWING I

The course analyses how to draw the human figure, both female and male with particular focus on anatomy analysis, proportions and the stylized drawing of the selected figure. Details of the body and its movement in space are further elements of study. Students are supplied with the fundamental tools to communicate and develop a fashion drawing, using different methods of hand illustration.

Prerequisite DRA100

 

ECO200

 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS*

The class has the aim of studying the Production Companies as subjects, which develop an economic activity of market transformation, showing their structural and functioning aspects. In order to do so, there will be illustrated the prevalent and innovative methods of Organization, Management tools and Control principles. At the end of the class the student will have learnt main knowledge about

 

 

Manufacturing Company System, which will help him to develop insights in topics of sectorial interest. There will be in-­‐depth analysis through the “Case Study”.
 

 

ENC101

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I*

This first required college level writing course introduces students to effective written communication through mastery of the writing process to include personal and professional contexts to include strategies for discussing, reviewing, development and structure, rhetorical strategies, organizational approaches, interpretive modes, of various written forms. Students will begin academic research skills to connect to their own writing and interests. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

 

ENC202

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II*

This second required college level writing course focuses on the research process and advanced strategies for the analysis and evaluation of sources. Students will increase their knowledge of the writing process by composing informative and persuasive essays using a research process. Additionally, this course will emphasize the need for writing accuracy and the revision process using the conventions of standard edited American English. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

ENV209

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE*

This course provides students with an introduction to environmental factors and provides a foundation for real life issues for the scientific aspects affecting sustainability, environmental policies, economics and the awareness of personal choices.
 

 

 

FAS100

 

 

FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH

Style and research, key to innovative design and creative ideas, is paramount throughout the course. Students are introduced to the role of the fashion stylist, and to visual representation as an ‘art’; presenting products or communicating a vision in order to attract and engage the fashion consumer. Through creative and visual research students discover the world of trends and the role and influence of visual representation. The course will develop the students’ ability to analyse, interpret and reference visual information, which is essential within the fashion industry.
 

 

HIS100

 

 

HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME

This course cover the evolution of the History of Dress from ancient times to the present. Students study a wide historical, political, social and cultural context looking at aspects involved in sartorial cutting and construction, as well as the development of the productive systems of materials, accessories, jewels, hairstyles and makeup. The relationships between art and fashion are analysed though the course of history, to finally make a comparison between past and contemporary fashion, dress and costume.
 

 

MAC105

 

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I*

This course introduces students the basic concepts of college mathematics to include algebra and will follow a logical sequence for students to gain confidence in polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.
 

 

MAC114

 

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II*

This course introduces the basic concepts of Euclidean geometry and non-­‐ Euclidean geometry utilizing a problem-­‐solving approach relevant to all majors. Students will explore the inductive method and review the foundations of geometric points, lines, segments; coverage of all 2-­‐D figures; and an analysis of coordinates, vectors, and trigonometric relations.
 

PSY201

 

PSYCHOLOGY*

This introductory course will provide students with engaging research and experiential knowledge. Individual focused topics will include learning and memory, emotions, perception, personality, motivation and behavior.
 

SOC200

 

SOCIOLOGY*

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of how society functions. It will examine social phenomena in terms of social forces, group relations and social structures. Sociological topics will include the social construction of knowledge, socialization and culture.
 

SPC201

 

SPEECH*

This course provides students with oral communication skills needed to develop stronger personal, professional and educational presentation and experiential use of speaking. Students will apply theory and techniques to individual and group settings.  Fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

 

TEX200

 

 

FABRICS & MATERIALS

Students learn how to recognize, manipulate and ‘read’ the materials and fabrics used in the fashion industry. Fibres are classified and studied together with the main techniques of fabric manufacturing. The knowledge of their intrinsic properties including weaving, finishing and printing techniques, allows students to acquire the basic skills in order to identify a fabric and apply it to works in the fashion industry. The world of yarns, leather and 2.0 materials is explored, with the aim of understanding the variety of technical/creative possibilities
 

 

WHO100

 

 

WORLD HISTORY*

This course provides students with a general understanding of the changes that have taken place in the world since the appearance of human kind. This course covers the breakup of the Old World, the events of the Middle Ages in Europe, the rise of industrialization, the growth of imperialism, the two world wars, the changes in the post war world, and globalization. This course also introduces students to the economic, political and social processes in the world of today.

 

Program Title: Fashion Design
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Course Number Course Title Course Description
 

 

ARH100

 

 

HISTORY OF ART*

This course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of western art through an evolution of History of Art from ancient times to the end of Late Middle Ages in Europe. The analysis is set in an extended historical, social, political and cultural context. The relationship between art and society, in centuries, is also studied to elaborate comparisons between past history and the contemporary cultural world.
 

BSC105

 

BIOLOGY*

This  course  is  for  non-­‐science  majors  to  provide  students  with  the  basic  biology concepts; selected topics will include: cell concept, evolution, genetics and ecology. The students are expected to use the scientific method of thinking to analyze and make informed decisions about the environment.
 

 

BUS200

 

FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

Through the recognition and understanding of the principles and practices of the main marketing tools, students develop a professional approach to the various marketing communications strategies that are applied in the fashion industry. The course takes a look at creative marketing in the contemporary fashion industry, considering traditional methods to online digital techniques in advertising and promotion.
 

 

BUS305

 

 

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

This course teaches students how different types of fashion organizations manage product design and development through studying supply chain and logistics, manufacturing processes and technology, and distribution and retailing. They will become familiar with different steps in supply chain management for the production of a fashion product, and will identify and manage critical business factors in the design, planning, development and production of a fashion collection.
 

 

COM100

 

 

DIGITAL DESIGN

This course teaches the basic notions of digital graphics for the field of Fashion Design. Through the study and the use of a variety of computer applications, students acquire the tools to work on photographic retouching and elaboration of images, with the purpose of presenting their creative ideas to a client or professional public. Students also learn how to use key software packages to create visual documents and presentations.
 

 

COM200

 

 

ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

This course helps students extend their knowledge of multimedia; web and digital design, analysing the basic components of digital design tools, among which vector graphics and animation. By combining an overall creative vision and web design techniques, students will be able to produce a final project consisting in the creation of their own home page.

Prerequisite COM100

 

 

COM300

 

 

DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION

This course provides students with the essential tools needed for the digital development of fashion illustrations and technical sheets.

Through the use of the Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator software, students will have the chance to elaborate their own illustrations, also applying the latest rendering techniques. Different illustration styles will be covered through the artistic analysis of the most important illustrators. Time is dedicated to the study of layouts, useful for the development of technical drawings for garments.

 

COM305

 

PORTFOLIO AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION I

This course provides students with advanced technical and digital notions for the presentation and communication of a portfolio collection project. Creating layout with specific software offers the student the opportunity to present accurately and in detail, all the technical and creative aspects of their work.

Prerequisite COM300

 

 

COM400

 

 

PORTFOLIO AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION II

The course discusses the creation of a Personal Portfolio based on the student’s visual identity. According to their career objectives, projects are selected and presentation methodologies are defined.

They study their own personal brand identity as well as the design of appropriate packaging. Materials, formats and different methodologies of print are analysed with the aim of presenting work to a professional level.

Prerequisite COM305

 

DRA100

 

DRAWING I

On this course students learn basic drawing techniques by working on direct observation, and using nature, objects and architecture as a source of study. Basic elements include: the representation of shape, light and shadow, and the study of space, depth and proportions. In order to develop new ideas, both traditional research tools and digital resources are used.
 

DRA200

 

FASHION DRAWING I

The course analyses how to draw the human figure, both female and male with particular focus on anatomy analysis, proportions and the stylized drawing of the selected figure. Details of the body and its movement in space are further elements of study. Students are supplied with the fundamental tools to communicate and develop a fashion drawing, using different methods of hand illustration.

 

Prerequisites DRA100
 

 

DRA300

 

 

FASHION DRAWING II

This course introduces students to colouring techniques used for the communication of ideas, concepts and details in a fashion product. The study and analysis of the main methodologies of manual rendering allows for a correct representation of matt and glossy effects, transparencies and textures of several fashion fabrics. By means of practical examples and a study based on observation of photographic images, fashion shows and illustrations, students acquire the fundamental techniques of fashion drawing using a variety of tools.
 

 

DRA305

 

 

FASHION DRAWING III

This subject allows students to evolve and extend their knowledge and skills in fashion drawing. Proportions and details are analysed for the professional representation of garments in 2D. The use of advanced colouring techniques and further experimentation with proportions allow students to build on their own individual illustration style, at a level suitable for publication.

Prerequisite DRA300

 

 

DRA400

 

 

FASHION COLLECTION

The main purpose of the course is to create an original collection with a strong individual imprint and personality by means of research and innovative creative experimentation. Importance is given to the aspects of aesthetic and image study. With an orientation towards marketing, students become conscious of markets and international trends, making their project highly professional and concrete.

Prerequisite DRA305

 

 

ECO200

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS*

The class has the aim of studying the Production Companies as subjects, which develop an economic activity of market transformation, showing their structural and functioning aspects. In order to do so, there will be illustrated the prevalent and innovative methods of Organization, Management tools and Control principles. At the end of the class the student will have learnt main knowledge about Manufacturing Company System, which will help him to develop insights in topics  of sectorial interest. There will be in-­‐depth analysis through the “Case Study”.
 

 

ENC101

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I*

This first required college level writing course introduces students to effective written communication through mastery of the writing process to include personal and professional contexts to include strategies for discussing, reviewing, development and structure, rhetorical strategies, organizational approaches, interpretive modes, of various written forms. Students will begin academic research skills to connect to their own writing and interests. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

 

ENC202

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II*

This second required college level writing course focuses on the research process and advanced strategies for the analysis and evaluation of sources. Students will increase their knowledge of the writing process by composing informative and persuasive essays using a research process. Additionally, this course will emphasize the need for writing accuracy and the revision process using the conventions of standard edited American English. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement..
 

ENV209

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE*

This course provides students with an introduction to environmental factors and provides a foundation for real life issues for the scientific aspects affecting sustainability, environmental policies, economics and the awareness of personal choices.
 

 

 

FAS100

 

 

FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH

Style and research, key to innovative design and creative ideas, is paramount throughout the course. Students are introduced to the role of the fashion stylist, and to visual representation as an ‘art’; presenting products or communicating a vision in order to attract and engage the fashion consumer. Through creative and visual research students discover the world of trends and the role and influence of visual representation. The course will develop the students’ ability to analyse, interpret and reference visual information, which is essential within the fashion industry.
 

 

HIS100

 

 

HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME

This course cover the evolution of the History of Dress from ancient times to the present. Students study a wide historical, political, social and cultural context looking at aspects involved in sartorial cutting and construction, as well as the development of the productive systems of materials, accessories, jewels, hairstyles and makeup. The relationships between art and fashion are analysed though the course of history, to finally make a comparison between past and contemporary fashion, dress and costume.
 

 

 

HIS300

 

 

FASHION HISTORY & CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE

This course looks at contemporary developments in Fashion Studies from 1900 to the present day. They discover Modernism and its impact on Fashion, together with the European avant-­‐garde movement in art.  Fashion and politics takes at look at World War I and World War II and their impact on the fashion world, through to studying the most important couturiers of 20th century and their importance  for the fashion world today: Paul Poiret, Madeleine Vionnet and her impact on the work of John Galliano, Gabrielle Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli and her collaboration with the Surrealists: Salvador Dali and Jean Cocteau.
 

MAC105

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I*

This course introduces students the basic concepts of college mathematics to include algebra and will follow a logical sequence for students to gain confidence in polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.

 

 

MAC114

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II*

This course introduces the basic concepts of Euclidean geometry and non-­‐Euclidean geometry utilizing a problem-­‐solving approach relevant to all majors. Students will explore the inductive method and review the foundations of geometric points,  lines, segments; coverage of all 2-­‐D figures; and an analysis of coordinates, vectors, and trigonometric relations.
 

 

 

PAT300

 

 

 

PATTERN CUTTING I

This course encourages students to understand the importance of research in the field of fashion design and pattern making. They learn the fundamental methods of creative research and gain the key skills to interpret, develop and elaborate their own research in order to create silhouettes and design details. Students work with a variety of tools to create two-­‐dimensional ideas and transform them in 3-­‐D shapes. The basic techniques of pattern making applied to the construction of simple garments such as skirts, trousers or dresses, provide a more technical understanding to the design approach.
 

 

 

PAT305

 

 

 

PATTERN CUTTING II

This course aims to analyse all the phases involved in the construction and production of a fashion garment. Initially the course focuses on the basic techniques of pattern making for the creation of shirts and jackets, on the analysis of shape, proportion and detail. Subsequently, all aspects involved in garment making are considered both at artisan and industrial level. Analysis on new production technologies which characterise contemporary industry, is also undertaken.

Prerequisite PAT300

 

 

PAT400

 

 

ATELIER I

This course moves forward on the development of silhouettes. Silhouettes are used as a base for the construction of the garments that compose the students final creative individual project. After the phases of pattern making, prototypes, and the various phases of fitting, final garments are made in fabric with the help of professional dressmakers and atelier workshops.

Prerequisite PAT305

 

 

PAT405

 

 

EXPERIMENTAL CUTTING

This course has the objective to encourage students to experiment innovative shapes and silhouettes, using traditional construction techniques, as well as alternative methods. These are the bases for the study of the silhouettes for the creative personal project, which will be the starting point for the construction of final outfits. Students acquire independence in the making of toilles and participate in the different fitting phases.

Prerequisite PAT305

 

 

PAT410

 

 

ATELIER II

This course evolves from the development of garment prototypes. Through a reorganization of their design work, students are encouraged to perfect and develop their pattern making techniques and creative ideas, resulting in the creation of a professional design collection that is suitable for presentation to the general public.

Prerequisite PAT400

 

PHI300

 

ETHICS*

This course will provide students with critical thinking skills while studying major theories of ethics. Ethics will be defined and analyzed to understand different points of view to include: values, cultural, socio-­‐economic and other influences allowing students to demonstrate effective reasoning skills to make decisions.
 

PHI305

 

CRITICAL THINKING*

This course, students will explore and help develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning” using the process of deductive argument and the notion of validity. Students are expected to use methods for analyzing and evaluating their beliefs by developing an ideological framework.
 

 

PRO400

 

 

INDUSTRY PROJECT

The course assists students in the planning of a project that mirrors the needs of  the fashion industry. By means of an accurate research, the student must be able to analyse markets and trends, elaborate the correct connections and conceptualise the creative development. The final objective of the process is to create personalised collections, with a style that can be associated to the brand DNA. Students will work on the principles of time management, work organization, problem solving, multi-­‐disciplinary collaborations, and teamwork.
 

 

 

PRO405

 

 

 

FINAL COLLECTION -­‐ THESIS

This course allows students to develop an individual and professional collection for a Fashion Show. Through research they work on evolving and completing their final collection, making it highly professional and contemporary on the base of critical analysis. The project must include innovative and original creative solutions with an eye to the future. The subject prepares students for a profession in the fashion industry, allowing them to acquire the skills to manage a workload in an independent and organized way.

Prerequisite DRA400

 

PSY201

 

PSYCHOLOGY*

This introductory course will provide students with engaging research and experiential knowledge. Individual focused topics will include learning and memory, emotions, perception, personality, motivation and behavior.
 

 

RES300

 

 

RESEARCH AND DESIGN

This course discusses the basic steps involved in the design of a fashion idea. Starting with an accurate analysis of international fashion trends, students will learn how to plan and develop a range of products built on a deep secondary and primary research. While working on their project, they study an existing brand from a social, economic, global and ethic perspective. Students are encouraged to research materials, to manipulate fabrics and to study colour palettes. On

 

 

completion of the course students are able to correctly organise a collection.
 

 

RES400

 

 

CREATIVE RESEARCH

On this course students independently experiment with garment creation based on their own interpretation of a fashion theme. They start experimenting with shapes and materials, with the aim of designing innovative outfits with a particular focus on individual image and style. Throughout the whole creative process they develop a fashion ‘taste’ and style, suitable for contemporary trends, and strengthen their own ‘creative personality’.

Prerequisite RES300

SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.
SPC201 SPEECH* This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.
 

STA300

 

STATISTICS*

The purpose of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge to make intelligent judgments and informed decisions by interpreting statistics and analyzing data. Among the topics studied are: collecting data, descriptive methods, probability material and inferential techniques.
 

 

TEX200

 

 

FABRICS AND MATERIALS

Students learn how to recognize, manipulate and read the materials and fabrics used in the fashion industry. Fibres are classified and studied together with the main techniques of fabric manufacturing. The knowledge of their intrinsic properties including weaving, finishing and printing techniques, allows students to acquire the basic skills in order to identify a fabric and apply it to works in the fashion industry. The world of yarns, leather and 2.0 materials is explored, with the aim of understanding the variety of technical/creative possibilities.
 

 

WHO100

 

 

WORLD HISTORY*

This course provides students with a general understanding of the changes that have taken place in the world since the appearance of human kind. This course covers the breakup of the Old World, the events of the Middle Ages in Europe, the rise of industrialization, the growth of imperialism, the two world wars, the changes in the post war world, and globalization. This course also introduces students to the economic, political and social processes in the world of today.

 

Program Title: Fashion Styling
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Course Number Course Title Course Description
 

 

 

ADV400

 

 

 

ADVERTISING IN STYLING

This course analyses the most important advertising campaigns in the luxury and mass-­‐market fashion sectors, through the study of the fundamentals of contemporary communication. Students will learn all concepts related to developing, promoting and selling an idea through styling. They will  research, develop and plan industry standard campaigns and catalogue pages for hypothetic clients in reaction to advertising briefs. Students will design, create and edit their own projects in relation to the brief utilising the skills gained in graphic design.
 

 

ARH100

 

 

HISTORY OF ART*

This course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of western art through an evolution of History of Art from ancient times to the end of Late Middle Ages in Europe. The analysis is set in an extended historical, social, political and cultural context. The relationship between art and society, in centuries, is also studied to elaborate comparisons between past history and the contemporary cultural world.
 

BSC105

 

BIOLOGY*

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge in Biology; topics will include: cell structure and function, evolution, genetics and ecology. The students are expected to use the scientific method of thinking to analyze and relate concepts to the environment.
 

 

BUS200

 

FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

Through the recognition and understanding of the principles and practices of the main marketing tools, students develop a professional approach to the various marketing communications strategies that are applied in the fashion industry. The course takes a look at creative marketing in the contemporary fashion industry, considering traditional methods to online digital techniques in advertising and promotion.
 

 

COM100

 

 

DIGITAL DESIGN

This course teaches the basic notions of digital graphics for the field of Fashion Design. Through the study and the use of a variety of computer applications, students acquire the tools to work on photographic retouching and elaboration of images, with the purpose of presenting their creative ideas to a client or professional public. Students also learn how to use key software packages to create visual documents and presentations.
COM200 ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN This course helps students extend their knowledge of multimedia; web and digital design, analysing the basic components of digital design tools, among

 

 

which vector graphics and animation. By combining an overall creative vision and web design techniques, students will be able to produce a final project consisting in the creation of their own home page.

Prerequisite COM100

 

COM310

 

GRAPHIC DESIGN I

This course teaches students the basics of visual design communication and presentation skills using Photoshop and InDesign software to create and present their ideas. Final work produced during the Fashion Styling 1 course will also be retouched and edited in this course.
 

 

 

COM315

 

 

 

GRAPHIC DESIGN II

This course teaches students how to create a magazine that encompasses their own graphic vision; by providing an understanding of how digital publishing is changing magazine design, learning how to retouch and edit images and how to output the magazine to print and/or digital media. Students will be proficient in the use of computer aided design software, e.g. Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign and will become skilled in producing a professionally fashion magazine layout. The magazine will contain all the final project outcomes created in Fashion Styling 2 and Photography 2.

Prerequisite COM310

 

COM410

 

GRAPHIC DESIGN III

Students will use all their acquired knowledge and abilities in Graphic Design (Photoshop and InDesign) to produce and present their final portfolio to a professional level. Students will work on the presentation, and explanation, of all their fashion editorials with a strong personal and individual visual identity.

Prerequisite COM315

 

COM415

 

DIGITAL PORTFOLIO

On this course students learn how to develop concepts for web design projects. They will design and create a personal interactive online portfolio which will include their fashion editorials and written work prepared in Graphic Design III. Prerequisite COM410
 

 

 

COM420

 

 

 

MULTIMEDIA

This course introduces students to the basic elements of visual storytelling. The focus is on understanding the mechanisms of narration as much as on the knowledge that is required to produce a convincing narrative. Through an indepth analysis of the different aspect of storytelling students will explore the world of moving images, aiming to understand what it is needed to create a coherent, meaningful and aesthetic work. This course allows students to develop their own fashion styling subject and encourages personal direction using contemporary media. On this course students will edit short fashion videos.

Prerequisite COM410

 

DRA100

 

DRAWING I

On this course students learn basic drawing techniques by working on direct observation, and using nature, objects and architecture as a source of study. Basic elements include: the representation of shape, light and shadow, and the study of space, depth and proportions. In order to develop new ideas, both traditional research tools and digital resources are used.
 

 

DRA200

 

 

FASHION DRAWING I

The course analyses how to draw the human figure, both female and male with particular focus on anatomy analysis, proportions and the stylized drawing of the selected figure. Details of the body and its movement in space are further elements of study. Students are supplied with the fundamental tools to communicate and develop a fashion drawing, using different methods of hand illustration.

Prerequisites DRA100

 

 

ECO200

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS*

The class has the aim of studying the Production Companies as subjects, which develop an economic activity of market transformation, showing their structural and functioning aspects. In order to do so, there will be illustrated the prevalent and innovative methods of Organization, Management tools and Control principles. At the end of the class the student will have learnt main knowledge about Manufacturing Company System, which will help him to develop insights in topics  of sectorial interest. There will be in-­‐depth analysis through the “Case Study”.
 

 

ENC101

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I*

This first required college level writing course introduces students to effective written communication through mastery of the writing process to include personal and professional contexts to include strategies for discussing, reviewing, development and structure, rhetorical strategies, organizational approaches, interpretive modes, of various written forms. Students will begin academic research skills to connect to their own writing and interests. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

 

ENC202

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II*

This second required college level writing course focuses on the research process and advanced strategies for the analysis and evaluation of sources. Students will increase their knowledge of the writing process by composing informative and persuasive essays using a research process. Additionally, this course will emphasize the need for writing accuracy and the revision process using the conventions of standard edited American English. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
ENV209 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE* This course provides students with an introduction to environmental factors and provides a foundation for real life issues for the scientific aspects affecting sustainability, environmental policies, economics and the awareness of personal choices.
FAS100 FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH Style and research, key to innovative design and creative ideas, is paramount throughout the course. Students are introduced to the role of the fashion stylist, and to visual representation as an ‘art’; presenting products or communicating a

 

vision in order to attract and engage the fashion consumer. Through creative and visual research students discover the world of trends and the role and influence of visual representation. The course will develop the students’ ability to analyse, interpret and reference visual information, which is essential within the fashion industry.
 

 

FAS300

 

 

FASHION STYLING I

Students will be provided with an introduction to professional aspects of the fashion styling industry. They will gain a real understanding of the diversity of professional roles undertaken by a stylist. Students will get their first experience of organising a fashion photo-­‐shoot, namely a still life editorial and a fashion editorial. The course also includes an introduction to the basic style ‘wardrobe’ through an historical and cultural analysis of information.
 

 

 

 

FAS305

 

 

 

 

FASHION STYLING II

This course is a learning and practice platform that allows students to research,  plan and organize photo shoots inspired by individual interests in the social, and/or cultural spheres. Students will work through a series of ‘styling challenges’ in a highly critical and exciting context learning how to question, reflect, provoke, work on error, and produce, through an often surprising process of personal and creative development. Students will take inspiration from a variety of different sources such as exhibitions, films, music, politics, society etc., and transform this inspiration into concepts for their fashion ‘stories’. This course also provides an introduction to other professional aspects of the fashion styling industry including client  awareness, competitors, markets and consumers.

Prerequisite FAS300

 

 

 

FAS400

 

 

FASHION STYLING AND EDITORIAL

This course gives students the possibility to work from a self-­‐initiated brief which in turn  provides  an  opportunity  to  display  to  their  personal  skills  and  knowledge. Independence  at  this  level  is  essential  and  collaborating  in  a  team  is  crucial  for students  wishing  to  work  in  the  area  of  styling  within  the  fashion  industry.  The variety  of  outcomes  required  presents  a  unique  opportunity  for  the  student  to create  a  portfolio  of  work  expressing  their  individualism  and  professionalism. Students will plan, organize and realize contemporary fashion editorials; all edited and presented in their final portfolio.

Prerequisite FAS305

HIS100 HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME This course cover the evolution of the History of Dress from ancient times to the present. Students study a wide historical, political, social and cultural context looking at aspects involved in sartorial cutting and construction, as well as the development of the productive systems of materials, accessories, jewels, hairstyles and makeup. The relationships between art and fashion are analysed though the course of history, to finally make a comparison between past and contemporary fashion, dress and costume.
HIS300 FASHION HISTORY AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE This course looks at contemporary developments in Fashion Studies from 1900 to the present day. They discover Modernism and its impact on Fashion, together  with the European avant-­‐garde movement in art.  Fashion and politics takes at look at World War I and World War II and their impact on the fashion world, through to studying the most important couturiers of 20th century and their importance  for the fashion world today: Paul Poiret, Madeleine Vionnet and her impact on the work of John Galliano, Gabrielle Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli and her collaboration with the Surrealists: Salvador Dali and Jean Cocteau.
HIS400 PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE ANALYSIS This course develops students visual literacy by learning the basic vocabulary used in the analyses of visual arts, and understanding the composition and ‘content’ of photographic material. Students discover key periods and styles in photographic history, and analyze important and emerging fashion photographers. They will investigate an artist’s inspiration in image creation, and use pictures as a starting point of discussion, rather than arriving at a ‘synthetic’ or literal interpretation.
MAC105 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I* This course introduces students the basic concepts of college mathematics to include algebra and will follow a logical sequence for students to gain confidence in polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.
MAC114 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II* This course introduces the basic concepts of Euclidean geometry and non-­‐ Euclidean geometry utilizing a problem-­‐solving approach relevant to all majors. Students will explore the inductive method and review the foundations of geometric points, lines, segments; coverage of all 2-­‐D figures; and an analysis of coordinates, vectors, and trigonometric relations..
 

PHI300

 

ETHICS*

This course will provide students with critical thinking skills while studying major theories of ethics. Ethics will be defined and analyzed to understand different points of view to include: values, cultural, socio-­‐economic and other influences allowing students to demonstrate effective reasoning skills to make decisions.
 

PHI305

 

CRITICAL THINKING*

This course, students will explore and help develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning” using the process of deductive argument and the notion of validity. Students are expected to use methods for analyzing and evaluating their beliefs by developing an ideological framework
PHO300 PHOTOGRAPHY I This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of fashion photography highlighting photographic compositions, lighting and the use of the environment (studio). Students will also work on and create different visual assignments

 

(editorials).
 

 

 

PHO305

 

 

 

PHOTOGRAPHY II

Students will plan, organize and realize fashion photo shoots (womenswear, menswear, trends and beauty) assigned in Fashion Styling 2 and learn how to collaborate effectively with photographers, makeup artists, hair stylists, and model agencies in managing and coordinating their projects. Students will also learn how to move forward in unfamiliar and unpredictable situations, e.g. model agencies cancelling models, changes in location availability, and will understand how to manage workloads and meet deadlines.

Prerequisite PHO300

PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* This introductory course will provide students with engaging research and experiential knowledge. Individual focused topics will include learning and memory, emotions, perception, personality, motivation and behavior.
 

 

RES410

 

TREND RESEARCH AND CREATIVE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT

This course provides the fundamentals of fashion trend forecasting, analysis and research. Students will collect and analyse data in order to produce trend books for the fashion industry. Students will gain the ability to forecast trends by looking at sub-­‐cultures, street style, trend spotting, photo blogging, in both a fashion and non-­‐fashion culture, and trend diversity. Students will plan and produce a fashion editorial project that demonstrates the identity of a fashion magazine using a chosen sub-­‐concept trend, developed within trend books.
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.
SPC201 SPEECH* This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.
 

STA300

 

STATISTICS*

The purpose of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge to make intelligent judgments and informed decisions by interpreting statistics and analyzing data. Among the topics studied are: collecting data, descriptive methods, probability material and inferential techniques.
 

 

TEX200

 

 

FABRICS AND MATERIALS

Students learn how to recognize, manipulate and read the materials and fabrics used in the fashion industry. Fibres are classified and studied together with the main techniques of fabric manufacturing. The knowledge of their intrinsic properties including weaving, finishing and printing techniques, allows students to acquire the basic skills in order to identify a fabric and apply it to works in the fashion industry. The world of yarns, leather and 2.0 materials is explored, with the aim of understanding the variety of technical/creative possibilities.
 

 

TRE300

 

 

TREND FORECASTING

This course introduces students to the role of the trend forecaster, looking at trend prediction, as well as the various methods of forecasting in the Fashion and luxury industries. The theories, concepts and methods constitute a framework that will facilitate the student to understand, interpret and anticipate developments and change for the near future. Researching seasonal trends, color, social and economic trends, consumer preferences and cultural indicators increase student’s ability in successful analysis and review.
 

 

VME400

 

 

VISUAL MERCHANDISING

This course covers Visual Merchandising within a fashion retail context, its strategies and purpose. Students will also explore the idea of visual merchandising aligned to the subject of fashion styling, contextualising and using relevant processes in visual branded design for VM installations and outcomes. Students will research, design and present a Fashion Retail Window Concept and an Instore  Retail Concept.
 

 

WHO100

 

 

WORLD HISTORY*

This course provides students with a general understanding of the changes that have taken place in the world since the appearance of human kind. This course covers the breakup of the Old World, the events of the Middle Ages in Europe, the rise of industrialization, the growth of imperialism, the two world wars, the changes in the post war world, and globalization. This course also introduces students to the economic, political and social processes in the world of today.
 

 

 

WRI400

 

 

ADVANCED FASHION WRITING

-­‐ THESIS

Students in this course gain a historical overview of the emergence of ‘critique’, or disciplined, systematic analysis of a written or oral works. They will be introduced to the practical side of the critic (blogger, national press, and fashion and art magazines) and learn key tools of the trade in order to put together a well-­‐ researched written critique. Students study and use semiotics as an analytical tool to understand what is conveyed in a visual image, and will learn how to research, plan and produce articles, fashion reviews, reportages, profiles (interviews) and press releases for exhibitions and fashion events. This courses develops both visual and written communication skills.

 

Program Title: Fashion Business
Credential Issued: Bachelor Of Art
Course Number Course Title Course Description

 

 

 

ARH100

 

 

HISTORY OF ART*

This course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of western art through an evolution of History of Art from ancient times to the end of Late Middle Ages in Europe. The analysis is set in an extended historical, social, political and cultural context. The relationship between art and society, in centuries, is also studied to elaborate comparisons between past history and the contemporary cultural world.
 

BSC105

 

BIOLOGY*

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge in Biology; topics will include: cell structure and function, evolution, genetics and ecology. The students are expected to use the scientific method of thinking to analyze and relate concepts to the environment.
 

 

BUS200

 

FASHION MARKETING: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

Through the recognition and understanding of the principles and practices of the main marketing tools, students develop a professional approach to the various marketing communications strategies that are applied in the fashion industry. The course takes a look at creative marketing in the contemporary fashion industry, considering traditional methods to online digital techniques in advertising and promotion.
 

 

BUS300

 

 

FASHION COMMUNICATION

This course provides an in depth explanation of the principles and practices of the main communication tools used in the fashion and luxury industry today. Following on from the Fashion Marketing Principles and practices, students develop a more professional and systematic approach to the communication strategies that are applied in industry, as well as the influence of communication tools in fashion and luxury marketing.
 

 

BUS305

 

 

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

This course teaches students how different types of fashion organizations manage product design and development through studying supply chain and logistics, manufacturing processes and technology, and distribution and retailing. They will become familiar with different steps in supply chain management for the production of a fashion product, and will identify and manage critical business factors in the design, planning, development and production of a fashion collection.
 

BUS310

 

MICROECONOMICS

This course introduces students to the world of business and economics in a fashion business context. Students learn key business and economic theories, looking at their influences and application via a Micro economic analysis of the fashion business and its industrial environments.
 

 

BUS315

 

 

BRAND AND BRANDING STRATEGIES

The course introduces students to the world of brands; to branding strategies and their application within the world of fashion and luxury. During the course students will examine the different theoretical frameworks and complex nature of brands, gaining a solid understanding of brand management, and analysing the influence that brands have on the success of a fashion organization; from mass markets and fast fashion, through to luxury.

Prerequisite BUS300

 

 

BUS320

 

 

FASHION BUYING

This course takes an indepth look at the buying process, working from ‘concept to consumer’ in relation to varied customer and market environments.

Students analyze the buying function, looking at different buyers’ responsibilities; learning how to determine what assortments to buy and which resources to select to produce a successful buying strategy.

Prerequisite BUS305

 

 

 

BUS325

 

 

 

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Building on an understanding of fashion theory, innovation and digitization in the buying and product development process, this course provides an understanding of supply chain management strategies for luxury brands and fashion products. Students investigate the design, planning, execution, control, and monitoring of supply chain activities, and by understanding the role of the supply chain manager they learn how products travel from the design studio, to the showroom and store.

Prerequisite BUS305

 

 

BUS400

 

 

MERCHANDISING

This course provides students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of the role and responsiblities of the Fashion Merchandiser within different fashion organizations. Students are introduced to the terminology of operating statements, inventory retail methods, planning seasonal purchases, calculating markups, turnover, stock-­‐sales ratios, open-­‐to-­‐buy, markdowns and terms of sale.

Prerequisite BUS325

 

BUS405

 

FASHION RETAIL MANAGEMENT

This course provides students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of the role and responsibilites of the retailer by analysing successful retail strategies across varied fashion organizations. Students will develop astute commercial awareness of retail theories and practices required in the management of fashion products for todays markets.
 

 

BUS410

 

 

FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT CONTROL

This   course   provides   an   in-­‐depth   understanding   of   Business   Finance   and Management  Control,  with  the  aim  of  developing  students’  skills  in  financial analysis,  and  their  ability  to  relate  accounting,  finance,  and  costings  within  a fashion context.The topics discussed capitalize on the principles of business, of economics   and   accounting,   with   a   more   in   depth   focus   on   finance   and management control.

Prerequisite BUS310

 

 

 

 

BUS415

 

 

STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN FASHION

This course provides students with the tools to critically examine the impact of evolving macro and micro environmental factors, on the competitive strategies of fashion organizations.

Students will analyse the key stages in formulating, developing and implementing various strategies in marketing, operations, finance, and human resources, and plan and recommend an appropriate course of action within a given scenario as part of an assessed group project.

 

 

BUS420

 

LUXURY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

This course introduces to students the luxury business, its management techniques, and strategies for the creation, communication and delivery of luxury products and services. Participants learn how to adapt communication, marketing and promotional techniques to reach sales goals and apply the key strategies of luxury businesses. The course addresses two areas: luxury branding together with business management and organization skills.
 

BUS425

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP This course provides an in-­‐depth understanding of the management thories and a strategic vision of a leader in a fast changing fashion business world. Students will also learn negotiation skills and how to make decisions as well as other relevant business skills that a leader needs.
 

 

COM100

 

 

DIGITAL DESIGN

This course teaches the basic notions of digital graphics for the field of Fashion Design. Through the study and the use of a variety of computer applications, students acquire the tools to work on photographic retouching and elaboration of images, with the purpose of presenting their creative ideas to a client or professional public. Students also learn how to use key software packages to create visual documents and presentations.
 

 

COM200

 

 

ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

This course helps students extend their knowledge of multimedia; web and digital design, analysing the basic components of digital design tools, among which vector graphics and animation. By combining an overall creative vision and web design techniques, students will be able to produce a final project consisting in the creation of their own home page.

Prerequisite COM100

 

COM430

 

DIGITAL MARKETING AND E-­‐ COMMERCE

This  course  critically  analyses  the  role  of  digital  marketing  within  business strategies  of  organizations  operating  in  the  fashion  and  luxury  industries. Students  will  learn  the  latest  E-­‐commerce  theories  and  practices  that  has changed  the  face  of  todays  retail  business,  and  will  look  at  digital  marketings influence on product sales, and consumer behavior.
 

DRA100

 

DRAWING I

On this course students learn basic drawing techniques by working on direct observation, and using nature, objects and architecture as a source of study. Basic elements include: the representation of shape, light and shadow, and the study of space, depth and proportions. In order to develop new ideas, both traditional research tools and digital resources are used.
 

 

DRA200

 

 

FASHION DRAWING I

The course analyses how to draw the human figure, both female and male with particular focus on anatomy analysis, proportions and the stylized drawing of the selected figure. Details of the body and its movement in space are further elements of study. Students are supplied with the fundamental tools to communicate and develop a fashion drawing, using different methods of hand illustration.

Prerequisite DRA100

 

 

ECO200

 

 

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS*

The class has the aim of studying the Production Companies as subjects, which develop an economic activity of market transformation, showing their structural and functioning aspects. In order to do so, there will be illustrated the prevalent and innovative methods of Organization, Management tools and Control principles. At the end of the class the student will have learnt main knowledge about Manufacturing Company System, which will help him to develop insights in topics  of sectorial interest. There will be in-­‐depth analysis through the “Case Study”.
 

 

ENC101

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION I*

This first required college level writing course introduces students to effective written communication through mastery of the writing process to include personal and professional contexts to include strategies for discussing, reviewing, development and structure, rhetorical strategies, organizational approaches, interpretive modes, of various written forms. Students will begin academic research skills to connect to their own writing and interests. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement.
 

 

ENC202

 

 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION II*

This second required college level writing course focuses on the research process and advanced strategies for the analysis and evaluation of sources. Students will increase their knowledge of the writing process by composing informative and persuasive essays using a research process. Additionally, this course will emphasize the need for writing accuracy and the revision process using the conventions of standard edited American English. This course fulfills a Gordon Rule requirement..
 

ENV209

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE*

This course provides students with an introduction to environmental factors and provides a foundation for real life issues for the scientific aspects affecting sustainability, environmental policies, economics and the awareness of personal choices.
 

FAS100

FASHION STYLING: VISUAL RESEARCH Style and research, key to innovative design and creative ideas, is paramount throughout the course. Students are introduced to the role of the fashion stylist, and to visual representation as an ‘art’; presenting products or communicating a vision in order to attract and engage the fashion consumer. Through creative and

 

visual research students discover the world of trends and the role and influence of visual representation. The course will develop the students’ ability to analyse, interpret and reference visual information, which is essential within the fashion industry.
 

 

HIS100

 

 

HISTORY OF DRESS AND COSTUME

This course cover the evolution of the History of Dress from ancient times to the present. Students study a wide historical, political, social and cultural context looking at aspects involved in sartorial cutting and construction, as well as the development of the productive systems of materials, accessories, jewels, hairstyles and makeup. The relationships between art and fashion are analysed though the course of history, to finally make a comparison between past and contemporary fashion, dress and costume.
 

 

 

HIS300

 

 

FASHION HISTORY & CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVE

This course looks at contemporary developments in Fashion Studies from 1900 to the  present  day.  They  discover  Modernism  and  its  impact  on  Fashion,  together with the European avant-­‐garde movement in art.  Fashion and politics takes at look at World War I and World War II and their impact on the fashion world, through to studying the most important couturiers of 20th century and their importance  for the  fashion  world  today:  Paul  Poiret,  Madeleine  Vionnet  and  her  impact  on  the work of John Galliano, Gabrielle Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli and her collaboration with the Surrealists: Salvador Dali and Jean Cocteau.
 

MAC105

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS I*

This course introduces students the basic concepts of college mathematics to include algebra and will follow a logical sequence for students to gain confidence in polynomials, equations, inequalities, the straight line, Cartesian coordinates, functions and graphs, systems of linear equations, logarithms and exponentials, matrix algebra, limit of a function, and derivate of a function and integral.
 

MAC114

 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS II*

This course introduces the basic concepts of Euclidean geometry and non-­‐ Euclidean geometry utilizing a problem-­‐solving approach relevant to all majors. Students will explore the inductive method and review the foundations of geometric points, lines, segments; coverage of all 2-­‐D figures; and an analysis of coordinates, vectors, and trigonometric relations.
 

PHI300

 

ETHICS*

This course will provide students with critical thinking skills while studying major theories of ethics. Ethics will be defined and analyzed to understand different points of view to include: values, cultural, socio-­‐economic and other influences allowing students to demonstrate effective reasoning skills to make decisions.
 

PHI305

 

CRITICAL THINKING*

This course, students will explore and help develop strategies for “learning to think” and “thinking for learning” using the process of deductive argument and the notion of validity. Students are expected to use methods for analyzing and evaluating their beliefs by developing an ideological framework.
 

 

 

PRO420

 

 

FASHION ENTREPRENEURSHIP

-­‐ THESIS

The aim of this course is to develop and launch a new brand or business concept within the fashion industry; to identify a gap in the market and apply appropriate business theories and processes in order to develop a suitable business plan.

The structure and content of a business plan depends on the nature of the business initiative and the target audience of the document. Students will undertake and manage a self-­‐directed business project as a major component of their degree in Fashion Business.

PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY* This introductory course will provide students with engaging research and experiential knowledge. Individual focused topics will include learning and memory, emotions, perception, personality, motivation and behavior.
SOC200 SOCIOLOGY* Students should understand their role in society and be capable of interpreting the social phenomena surrounding them. This course provides students with a basic understanding of how the society functions, and specifically how groups work.
SPC201 SPEECH* This course helps a student develop his or her abilities and skills in expression and the spoken language. Students apply the techniques of oral exposition and learn to distinguish between the different techniques used in organized oral discussions.
 

STA300

 

STATISTICS*

The purpose of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge to make intelligent judgments and informed decisions by interpreting statistics and analyzing data. Among the topics studied are: collecting data, descriptive methods, probability material and inferential techniques.
 

 

TEX200

 

 

FABRICS AND MATERIALS

Students learn how to recognize, manipulate and read the materials and fabrics used in the fashion industry. Fibres are classified and studied together with the main techniques of fabric manufacturing. The knowledge of their intrinsic properties including weaving, finishing and printing techniques, allows students to acquire the basic skills in order to identify a fabric and apply it to works in the fashion industry. The world of yarns, leather and 2.0 materials is explored, with the aim of understanding the variety of technical/creative possibilities
 

 

TRE300

 

 

TREND FORECASTING

This course introduces students to the role of the trend forecaster, looking at trend prediction, as well as the various methods of forecasting in the Fashion and luxury industries. The theories, concepts and methods constitute a framework that will facilitate the student to understand, interpret and anticipate developments and change for the near future. Researching seasonal trends, color, social and economic trends, consumer preferences and cultural indicators increase student’s ability in successful analysis and review.
VME400 VISUAL MERCHANDISING This course covers Visual Merchandising within a fashion retail context, its

 

 

strategies and purpose. Students will also explore the idea of visual merchandising aligned to the subject of fashion styling, contextualising and using relevant processes in visual branded design for VM installations and outcomes. Students will research, design and present a Fashion Retail Window Concept and an Instore  Retail Concept.
 

 

WHO100

 

 

WORLD HISTORY*

This course provides students with a general understanding of the changes that have taken place in the world since the appearance of human kind. This course covers the breakup of the Old World, the events of the Middle Ages in Europe, the rise of industrialization, the growth of imperialism, the two world wars, the changes in the post war world, and globalization. This course also introduces students to the economic, political and social processes in the world of today.

 

GRADUATE PROGRAM(S) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Program Title: Fashion & Luxury Brand Management
Credential Issued: Master Of Arts
Course Number Course Title Course Description
 

 

LBM511

 

 

FUTURE OF FASHION

It is essential for students who study Fashion and Luxury Brand Management to be aware of the context in which the industry operates and the key drivers that impact that industry. This forward-­‐looking course supports a core understanding of the world of luxury fashion, from micro and macro trends and forecasting, to the significant social and cultural movements that affect the industry, such as digitality, innovation, sustainability and ethical considerations, as well as emerging international fashion centres.
 

 

LBM512

 

 

STRATEGIC MARKETING AND RETAIL ANALYSIS

This course provides a strong theoretical framework from which to understand and apply fashion marketing techniques. Students will study marketing segmentation, targeting, positioning, planning and the marketing mix with particular reference to the retail environment, as well as analysing fashion consumer markets and the principles of consumer behaviour. Students will develop an understanding of different perspectives to fashion marketing and apply these to real world situations through project work.
 

 

LBM513

 

 

COMMUNICATION STRATEGIES

This course explores the ever-­‐evolving world of marketing communication strategies, drawing on fashion industry case studies to help students to develop a deeper understanding of success factors. Media planning and strategy, public relations, sales promotions, direct marketing, CSR, the digital landscape of communications, fashion advertising and creative communication strategies, as well as laws and regulations associated with marketing communications are included amongst the topics.
 

 

LBM514

 

 

RESEARCH METHODS

Research Methods supports students in developing the core competencies and academic rigour required for study at postgraduate level. Through a series of lectures and activities, students will be able to gain the theoretical and practical understanding needed to create effective coursework and capstone project proposals. Lectures will cover the reflective process, the review of literature, research methodologies, structuring research
 

 

LBM515

 

 

DEVELOPING BRAND IDENTITIES

Well produced, brand-­‐appropriate presentation of work is considered a benchmark of professionalism in the luxury fashion industry. This course will support students in developing the ability to make sound judgements about how work may be persuasively presented and the different visual strategies that may be employed. An understanding of the principles of visual communication for a specialist and non-­‐specialist audience are addressed through workshops in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.
 

 

LBM516

 

 

ROLE OF DESIGN AND CREATIVITY

Creative flair coupled with market awareness are advantageous in luxury brand management. This course supports students’ ability to think critically and creatively in the proposal of innovative fashion products for a specified luxury brand. Based on in-­‐depth brand and market research, students will generate and justify a well devised, brand-­‐appropriate collection, building on trend forecasts and the application of personal design research, collection of fabric samples, developing a colour story and mood board and producing technical information for the range.
 

 

 

LBM517

 

 

 

FASHION PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

In order to develop a successful branded product and take it to market, students need a good understanding of the processes involved. In this course, they will develop essential product development skills for a given market. This course works in conjunction with The Role of Creativity to form a cohesive package of specialist learning. The range will be presented from concept to consumer, enabling students to further develop their understanding of the application of creative thinking, brand analysis and the interpretation of key brand aesthetics, through to product development and production. The importance of developing effective strategies for supply chain management will also be addressed, and the growing imperative for sustainable sourcing.
LBM518 COMMERCIALISATION AND New and evolving landscapes of the fashion retail environment are explored, through the analysis of innovative visual merchandising strategies for online

 

RETAIL retailing, bricks and mortar retailing and omni-­‐channel retailing, as key to contemporary commercialisation strategies.
 

 

 

 

 

LBM519

 

 

 

 

BRANDS AND BRANDING STRATEGIES

Students will study the strategic brand management process. This starts with conducting brand audits to identify strengths and weaknesses of brands, developing brand strategies, setting key performance indicators and defining execution plans. Branding topics such as brand equity, brand personality, brand identity and brand extensions will be studied and students will be given the opportunity to research and critically analyse the application to luxury brands identifying key success factors and pitfalls. The Unit also explores contemporary branding topics such as digital branding, brand experience as well as rebranding, corporate social responsibility and globalisation. The application of branding by fashion and luxury brands is an art which students will be able to master by being exposed to various frameworks, theories, case-­‐studies and live projects. Students will develop their analytical, critical, research and communications skills but most importantly become creative problem solvers.
 

LBM521

 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

Essential to the contemporary fashion brand, the concept of authorship is  explored, as well as licensing rights and the protection of intelletual property. Other contractual instruments for developing brands are explored:  joint ventures agreements, co-­‐operation agreements, distribution and agency, agreements, other relevant provisions. The challenges of counterfeiting are also expounded.
 

 

LBM522

 

 

BUSINESS OF LUXURY

This course investigates the various meanings of luxury and provides an in-­‐depth analysis of the main pitfalls, similarities and differences between Premium and Luxury concepts. The course looks at how luxury brands evolve to respond to changing habits and trends in consumption, without losing their DNA and their codes. Using examples and cases from the world of luxury, there is a strong focus on the main business models adopted by various luxury brands to grow within a global conglomerates or as independent.
 

 

 

LBM523

 

 

 

MANAGING LUXURY

This course covers various aspects of luxury brand management, through understanding the concepts and strategies of brand valuations, performance management, growth, and market entry. A range of tools, methods and techniques will be discussed and analysed in the context of their usefulness to integrate theory intro real life examples and cases from the luxury world. Together with the  Business of Luxury, this course assesses the current opportunities and challenges facing luxury brands through a deep understanding of the critical success factors needed to succeed and grow in the luxury industry.
 

 

 

LBM524

 

 

 

CREATING, COMMUNICATING AND DELIVERING LUXURY

This course will apply strategies for the creation, communication and delivery of luxury, based on a critical analysis of the visual and experiential language of luxury. Students will explore the main ingredients required to create luxury, identify brand codes for communications strategies as well as formulating operating procedures to deliver coherent brand experiences at every touch point. How the luxury service culture strive to deliver wow experiences online and offline will be analysed.

Furthermore, students will examine the strong links between luxury brands, the arts and philanthropy. Here students will be given the opportunity to be entrepreneurial and revive or create a luxury brand.

 

LBM525

 

FASHION ENTREPRENEURS

Complimenting the course in Creating, Communicating and Delivering Luxury, this course supports the development of entrepreneurial skills. The ability to identify and exploit professional opportunities is essential to work with luxury brands or for those who wish to establish their own brands. Concepts of self-­‐branding and the strategic development of professional networks are also covered in this course.
 

 

LBM601

 

 

CAPSTONE PROJECT

The capstone project represents the culmination of a student’s academic learning and may take a variety of forms. Students may select a course of personal and professional interest and relevance, and conduct and document an in depth investigation into the topic. Students will meet with a designated supervisor to support them through the development of their project. Outcomes may be a final collection, a product, a presentation, a short film or an academic paper that will be presented and orally defended to a panel of tutors and experts in the field.

 

FACULTY LISTING 

INSTRUCTOR/DEGREES RENE ALVAREZ

MBA

CODE LBM522 LBM523 COURSE TITLE BUSINESS OF LUXURY MANAGING LUXURY
BA English LBM519 BRANDS AND BRANDING STRATEGIES
BUS315 BRAND & BRANDING STRATEGIES
ECO200 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
BUS310 MICROECONOMICS
LBM518 COMMERCIALISATION AND RETAIL
BUS415 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN FASHION
PRO420 FASHION ENTREPRENEURSHIP: THESIS
JUDITH ANDERSON SPC201 SPEECH
Ed.D. Org Leadership LBM514 RESEARCH METHODS
Ed.D. Org Leadership STA300 STATISTICS
BA English BUS300 FASHION COMMUNICATION
BUS425 MANAGEMENT & STRAT. LEADERSHIP
MILAGROS BELLO ARH100 HISTORY OF ART
PhD Art History WHO100 SOCIOLOGY
MS Sociology
BS Sociology
MARIO BRAGHIERI PAT300 PATTERN CUTTING 1
MA Higher Education PAT305 PATTERN CUTTING 2
BA Fashion Design PAT400 ATELIER
PAT405 EXPERIMENTAL CUTTING
PAT410 ATELIER 2
MASSIMO CASAGRANDE DRA200 FASHION DRAWING 1
MFA Fashion Design LBM517 FASHION PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
BA Fashion Design LBM524 CREATING, COMM & DELIVERY LUXURY
LBM516 ROLE OF DESIGN AND CREATIVITY
LBM525 FASHION ENREPERNEURS
LBM601 CAPSTONE PROJECT
TRE300 TREND FORECASTING
TRE300 TREND FORECASTING
DRA300 FASHION DRAWING 2
RES300 RESEARCH AND DESIGN
DRA305 FASHION DRAWING 3
DRA400 FASHION COLLECTION
RES400 CREATIVE RESEARCH
PRO400 INDUSTRY PROJECT
PRO405 FINAL COLLECTION-­‐THESIS
TRE300 TREND FORECASTING
LBM511 FUTURE OF FASHION
HIS300 F. HISTORY & CONTEMP. PERSPECTIVES
DANIELE D’ORAZI BUS430 DIGITAL MARKETING & E-­‐COMMERCE
MA Media Communication BUS420 LUXURY BRAND MANAGEMENT
BA Political Science LBM512 STRATEGIC MKTING & RETAIL ANALYSIS
LBM513 COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGIES
LBM515 DEVELOPING BRAND IDENTITIES
COM420 MULTIMEDIA
MILVA DI LORENZO TEX200 FABRICS & MATERIALS
MA Higher Education
BA Fashion Design
FEDLINE FERJUSTE PHI300 ETHICS
JD Law LBM521 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

 

MS Taxation BS Accounting BUS410 FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT CONTROL
SHERIE GACHE

PhD Film Communications MFA   Creative   Writing    BA Journalism

ENC101 SOC200 WRI400 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1

ENGLISH  COMPOSTITION 2  ADVANCED FASHION WRITING: THESIS

LUCREZIA MANCINI

Higher education Cert BA Fashion Styling

FAS100 WME400 FAS300 FAS305 ADV400 FAS400 HIS400 RES410 VME400 FASHION STYLING VISUAL RESEARCH VISUAL     MERCHANDISING     FASHION STYLING

FASHION STYLING 2 ADVERTISING IN STYLING FASHION STYLING & EDITORIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE ANALYSIS

TREND RES. & CREATIVE RES. DEVELOP. VISUAL MERCHANDISING

PRISCA MILLIANCE

MA Fashion Studies

BA Fashion Merchandising

BUS305 BUS400 COM300 BUS320 BUS405 BUS325 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MERCHANDISING DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION FASHION BUYING

FASHION RETAIL MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

ALBENA PETRUS

MFA Graphic Design BA Graphic Design

COM315 COM410 COM400 COM415 GRAPHIC DESIGN 2

GRAPHIC  DESIGN 3  PORTFOLIO & VISUAL COMM 2 DIGITAL PORTFOLIO

LINDA PHELPS

MFA Visual Arts BA Photography

DRA100 PHO305 PHO300 DRAWING 1

PHOTOGRAPHY 2

PHOTOGRAPHY 1

HILDA RODRIGUEZ

PhD Biology MS Biology BS Biology

BSC105 ENV209 BIOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
ALECIA SACHS

MS Mathematics BS Mathematics

MAC105 MAC114 PHI305 COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 1

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 2 CRITICAL THINKING

ANDRES SUAREZ

MFA Interior Design BS Interior Design

COM100 COM200 COM305 COM310 DIGITAL  DESIGN  ADVANCED DIGITAL DESIGN

PORTFOLIO & VISUAL COMM 1 GRAPHIC DESIGN 1

DOLLEEN VIGUIE

MA Humanities

BA Fashion Merchandising

HIS100 WHO100 BUS200 HISTORY OF ART & DRESS WORLD HISTORY

F. MARKETING PRINCIPLES & PRACTICE

REBECCA WANG

PhD Clinical Psychology MS Psychology

BS Psychology

PSY201 PSYCHOLOGY

 

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